Chronically Living and how to make the most of it

How Can I Reduce Autoimmune Inflammation with Food? with Elizabeth Yarnell

November 29, 2021 Kelsey Harris, Elizabeth Yarnell Season 2 Episode 23
Chronically Living and how to make the most of it
How Can I Reduce Autoimmune Inflammation with Food? with Elizabeth Yarnell
Show Notes Transcript

This week we explore what inflammation actually does in our body, and how what we eat can affect it. But this isn't a follow this specific diet episode. Elizabeth Yarnell, ND, helps us understand how individually tailoring what we eat to ourselves can usually do the trick.
In this episode we discuss:

  • what inflammation is
  • three-step process to testing for inflammation
  • how to figure out what we can and can't eat
  • how all of this can impact our overall health

Guest Bio:
Since being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis at age 30, Elizabeth Yarnell has spent the past 20 years studying how to manage autoimmunity naturally as a traditional naturopath. She’s worked with hundreds of MS and other autoimmune sufferers in her nationwide clinic using unique, personalized natural therapies to help them slow or even reverse the course of their disease. She’s a TEDx speaker, award-winning author whose cookbook has sold more than 60,000 copies, a patented inventor, and has been featured on CBS, NBC, ABC, and PBS as well as in Good Housekeeping, Health, Martha Stewart Living Radio, and many other outlets.
You can find Elizabeth @ elizabethyarnell.com
Check out her MS diet website: multiplesclerosisdiet.com
Find her cookbook @ gloriousonepotmeals.com

Follow the show on Instagram @chronically.living_
Support the show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/chronically_living

Kelsey Harris:

inflammation is such a problem for anyone with an autoimmune disease. Most of us are given anti inflammatory medications by our doctors. But the problem is usually the side effects are really bad. I had to go off of NSAIDs because they were destroying my stomach. But what are some ways we can reduce inflammation naturally? What have you tried or not tried? And what is the science behind inflammation anyway? If any of this piques your interest, then stay tuned is naturopathic doctor and Ms. Warrior Elizabeth Yarnell shares her expertise on this week's episode of chronically living. I'm Kelsey Harris, chronic illness warrior and psychotherapist on chronically living and how to make the most of it, we're providing tangible ways to improve the well being of spoonies. So get ready to make the most out of your life even with that pesky chronic illness.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

My name is Elizabeth Yarnell I am a traditional naturopath and inflammation expert, and I live in Denver, Colorado, but my clinic is virtual. And so I work with anyone in North America,

Kelsey Harris:

Elizabeth came to be a naturopath because of her experiences with her own autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

So for me, it really started one day in 1998, when I went to sleep as usual, and I woke up the next morning blind in my right eye. And in short order, I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, which is a degenerative autoimmune disease that affects mainly the nervous system. And what I learned at that time was that 80% of MS patients will be in a wheelchair within 10 years of diagnosis. And that really was what sparked my journey, and still is my motivation today to stay out of that wheelchair. So when I got diagnosed, first, my doctor said, you know, there's nothing you can do. It's MS. It's an autoimmune disease, we don't know why you have it, we don't know why you got it. We don't know how to fix it. We know it's incurable. And then they showed me this lovely chart. And probably every MS patient has seen this in their MS doctor's office. And it's this literal downhill slope. And this is the quality of life for people with multiple sclerosis. And I said to my doctor, but what if I change my diet and my lifestyle, and I'm more active, and I exercise my brain and continue to learn and all these things. And he said, Well, that's all good stuff. But it doesn't matter. You might be able to stay up at the top of this slope for a little while longer, but you're still going to end up at the bottom of the slope, just like every other person with MS. And I thought, well, I don't want to buy into that. That's not the way I want my life to be. And I was trying to figure out well, what could I do to be more proactive about my future, because obviously, it mattered more to me than to my doctor. And it was my then fiance at the time now my husband of 20, some years, who suggested that maybe it might have something to do with what I had been eating. And when I was forced to take a look at it, I had to recognize that really for the entire decade of my 20s when I was a single girl living in my own apartment, my only staple foods were Crystal Light Diet Coke and gummy bears. So maybe it wasn't that surprising that at the end of this decade when I was about to turn 30 That my body would completely fall apart on me. So I thought okay, well, I don't know what a healthy diet is. So I started reading resources like the ABA and the Mayo Clinic. And really what I garnered from all of these different resources that I was studying was that whole foods were better than processed foods. And I thought, Okay, well, what does that mean? And how do you make whole foods because at that time, really, I had either been eating fast food or having leftovers from restaurants I was a girl on the run I never really cooked at home if I bought any piece of produce it went bad long before I ever thought even to prepare it into anything. So I pretty quickly realized that it trying to follow whole foods diet was going to be quite an undertaking. I started taking cooking classes and watching the Food Network which was just in its infancy at that time, and then experimenting in my kitchen. And one of the hallmarks of MS is fatigue. And so spending all these hours preparing a whole foods based meal and then facing a filthy kitchen for 45 minutes afterwards to try to clean up really didn't feel sustainable to me. One night now my husband and I were watching late night TV it was in the days before we could afford cable. So we had four channels, You were alive during those days. And there was this infomercial that came on. And this guy said, look, I can make your whole meal in this countertop appliance. And he puts in dry rice, and then a can of tomatoes, and then a metal grate like a barbecue grill type great. And then chicken brass, and then another metal grate, and then brownies on the top of that covers the whole thing with a dome, plugged it in and turns it on. And I thought, wow, that is brilliant. I want to be able to make my whole meal, my whole Whole Foods meal right in one appliance. But I don't have that countertop appliance. And I don't have any of those metal barbeque grill type grades. And I don't really care about the brownies. And so I went over to my oven, and I had just received a cast iron dutch oven as a wedding gift, and didn't know what to do with it. But I thought you know, I bet that countertop appliance that guy was using probably gets pretty hot look like that food cooked pretty quickly. So I turned up my oven to 450 degrees. And so all the people who know how to cook now are starting to be horrified 450 degrees, you don't cook anything except for like pizza and bread at 450 degrees. But I didn't know and I went to my freezer and I pulled out a frozen fish filet and some veggies from my garden and some herbs and I put them all on my cast iron dutch oven, put the lid on it, put it into my 450 degree oven, and in about a half an hour just started to smell like dinner. And that just became the way that we cooked, we would just take these whole foods and put them into this cast iron dutch oven and flash put them in the super hot oven. And I didn't really even think that much about it until my college roommate came to visit for a week. And at the end of the week, she said Would you please teach me how to cook like you cook? And I thought, well, you know, your mom's Italian, you know, you're pretty good cook. And she said, Yeah, but not like this. And I said, Well, you've seen me do it. It's just literally I just throw things into the cast iron dutch oven. And she said, I think there's a little bit more to it than that. So that's when I sat down and I wrote out a manuscript for my cookbook. And then I spent the next five years trying to find an agent or publisher to publish it. And I got, I don't even know 30 rejection letters all saying basically the same thing. Like it's a good manuscript, but no one's gonna buy a cookbook from a nobody, you don't have a cooking show, like Rachael Ray, you don't have a restaurant like Wolfgang Puck, you're not a household name, like Martha Stewart. And so no one's gonna buy your cookbook. And finally, in 2005, I decided to, I decided I either had to self publish it or drop the whole thing. And by that time, I had already done television appearances, I had appeared at many, many health fairs and other types of events. And I had a mailing list of a couple 1000 already on my email. So I went ahead and I self published. And it turned out to be a really great decision I had resisted because I have MS. I don't want to sell cookbooks out of the trunk of my car. But I self published and I sold out my entire first print round of I think 3000 books. In the first month of publication, I made the local bestsellers list for four months or so like that. I ended up selling 15,000 copies myself, and then got picked up by Random House who republished it in 2009. You can kind of see my cookbook behind me on the wall here. And the cookbook is still selling it's I've sold more than 65,000 copies now, which is really gratifying because it's just a really quick and easy way for anybody to eat healthier foods on a more regular basis. And that great alternative to takeout and all sorts of complicated cooking and, and I taught cooking classes for, I don't know 15 years, and brought lots of kids through my cooking classes, lots of novice cooks. And it's just a really, really easy way to cook. And that really was what got me interested in natural health to begin with. I started taking classes I wanted to become more knowledgeable about how foods affect how we feel and function. And I went on and I became a traditional naturopath got my doctorate and opened my clinic in 2011 Really focusing on customized anti inflammatory diets and other natural therapies to remove inflammation.

Kelsey Harris:

Elizabeth has been on quite a journey. And I find it interesting that she wrote the cookbook before she came became a naturopath. Clearly what she eats has been helpful for her. Let's hear a bit more about inflammation because as autoimmune warriors it's something we're all pretty familiar with.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

Over the last 20 years I have find To my theory, about autoimmunity, and really just focus on the inflammatory part of it, that it matters less how the inflammation manifests in a body, it doesn't matter. Like for me, I had optic neuritis, right, I went blind in my eye, I have MS, I'm having inflammation around my nerves in my hand and my spine, you might have lupus, you might have inflammation around your joints, you might have arthritis, you might have any kind of auto immune or chronic ailments. And as long as they're based in inflammation, it's really kind of the same thing. And the therapies that I use in my clinic, which I have fine tuned to a three pronged approach. So the centerpiece is a food sensitivity test that I use. The one that I believe in and think is the gold standard of food sensitivity testing, it's called the M R T, the mediator release test. It is different than any of these food sensitivity tests that you see on TV or that you might find even in an allergist office, because those are all looking for antibodies, which are unreliable factors of inflammation. And instead, this test looks for mediator release. And the most famous mediator we all know is histamine, we know that if we have say a bee sting or poison ivy encounter, and we take an anti histamine, like Benadryl, that we can get some relief from the pain from that swelling. There are 80 or more mediators besides histamine that our bloodstream can release upon exposure to what it deems to be a threat. So by focusing on inflammation and the inflammatory mediators, it allows me to take out all the guesswork about what you should or shouldn't be eating. So instead of doing an elimination diet and saying, oh, A, B, and C turned up high on my test, I'm going to just eliminate them and then you, you're in the wild, wild west, you have every other food option to you, and you don't know if those things are going to be inflammatory as well. So instead, we focus on X, Y and Z, the foods that are least inflammatory for you that we can see through the test. And that's how we've designed a customized anti inflammatory diet

Kelsey Harris:

Wait, no elimination diet?! I have spoken before on the show about how hard I found it to change my eating habits, not that I eat healthfully. Though, you might be interested to hear that I've actually changed it more recently, but that's for another day. One thing I hear people often say is that the AIP diet is so difficult, especially at first. So I think the idea of doing a food sensitivity tests to figure out what should be removed sounds a heck of a lot easier. So if that's step one, what step two.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

And then the second piece of that is to address the digestive tract because 1000s of bowel biopsies not done by me, but done by gi teams have confirmed that chronic inflammation causes damage to the GI tract. And we know that 80% or more of our immunity is based in our GI tract. And incomplete digestion can lead to a host of issues. So in order to see what's going on there, I use a 24 hour urine analysis. And that shows me where we need to supplement to help achieve complete digestion and heal the gut. Leaky Gut all part of that for sure. I

Kelsey Harris:

actually recently had a conversation with one of the RMTs at one of the clinics I work at about leaky gut and its relationship to autoimmunity. Okay, let's hear part three.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

And then the third part of this is actually because I have really found that so many cases of autoimmune issues or chronic inflammation are actually due to hidden parasitic infection. And so I start everybody out on a 30 day parasite protocol to get rid of any buggers that are there and just level the playing field and in fact, tomorrow I am at a conference and I will be speaking about the connection between parasites and autoimmunity because I think this is so unrecognized.

Kelsey Harris:

Okay, so if we want to reduce inflammation naturally, it sounds like what we eat as a huge part of that. That leaves me with the question, what should we And shouldn't we be eating?

Unknown:

The the centerpiece of what I do is an anti inflammatory diet. And I think that is really the key to so many things. Our food supply is contaminated. We have GMOs, we have all sorts of additives and preservatives and not to mention the food colors and flavors, artificial flavors that are everywhere. Artificial sweeteners. I mean, look at me in my 20s Right. I thought aspartame was the best thing since sliced bread, my diet coke that was my best friend. But there is such a thing called aspartame poisoning and it can mimic the signs of autoimmunity. There's just so many contaminants and nobody is really watching out for the consumer And the amount of these in our food supply have just increased astronomically. And nobody is counting up how many exposures any one person is getting in a day to say food colors and dyes that you might get through your lotions, and through your shampoos. And through your dishwashing liquid dimension, your any pills or supplements that you're taking on your sunscreen in your makeup, in your foods that have colors in, I just could go on and on and on. So when you asked me, Are there things that everybody should stay away from? I say, yes, absolutely, you should do the best you can to read labels. And if there are toxic, or chemical ingredients in there that you don't recognize that are not foods, you should not eat that. Other than that, it's very individual for people, I often have people who say, I'm scared to come up to you, because I don't want to give up my coffee, or my chocolate or my wine or something like that. And I say, I have no idea what you're going to have to give up. We're going to test you. And we're not going to guess I'm not going to say give up gluten. Everybody should give a gluten Well, that's not true. And when I test everybody, not everybody needs to. So it is there's nothing universal. I wish there were I'd write a book and get really rich and famous.

Kelsey Harris:

What I find interesting is that most people say you have to give up gluten if you have an autoimmune disease, and the same with dairy and sugar. But when Elizabeth tests people, this isn't necessarily the case. Now I personally do feel better when I don't have gluten or dairy. But I didn't have a specific test to see if they're actually affecting me and just use some of my noticing skills. What Elizabeth is basically saying is that for some people, yes, you have to give these up. But other people will not have to.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

You're absolutely right. That is exactly what I'm saying. And bring up the whole sugar thing that drives me crazy. This Universal Declaration. Oh, sugar, is that an inflammatory? Well, the most of the sugars that people are getting in America are not sugar. They're not cane sugar. They're high fructose corn syrup. They're artificial sugar, sugar alternatives. And yes, those are inflammatory 100%. But oftentimes, cane sugar is not. So we need to really think about what we call sugar. So all these artificial synthetic, anything made in a laboratory should not go on a human body. Anything that's derived from petroleum, like food, dyes and colors are should not go inside a human body. Evolution did not prepare us to metabolize things that were dug up from three miles below the earth.

Kelsey Harris:

Okay, so if that's what we shouldn't be eating, mainly processed foods made labs that are chock full of preservatives and artificial flavors, then what should we be eating?

Elizabeth Yarnell:

I'm a proponent of whole foods. And I feel like if you can focus on eating whole foods, rather than processed foods, you're gonna do your body a huge, huge favor, is you know, if you come from a diet of McDonald's all the time, and you start cooking, say glorious on top meals, I cook for my cookbook, or just focusing more on whole foods, you're going to feel better no matter if you have a diagnosis of something or not. That's just the fact because of the way that the human body works. I mean, we are such amazing genes. And there are so many tiny, tiny little factors in health, that we're not even aware of all of them. I'm sure so many haven't even been discovered yet. I mean, we just discovered vitamin C, about 100 years ago. And still people are not convinced of the efficacy and the need for vitamin C. So what should people be doing, they should be making sure that they have the right minerals, and vitamins. And you can get a lot of these things just through eating whole foods. I love the science. So let's go there. So what happens is when you eat something, it goes into your stomach. But this can also happen when you just are touching something or breathing something or smelling something because it's molecules, even an aroma is a molecule. So anytime that you encounter a new molecule, what happens is that your body has a set of white blood cells called T cells that receive information, what is this molecule? And the T cells decide can they identify this molecule? You're nodding, you probably recognize T cells, right? Because they're so implicated in multiple sclerosis and really all autoimmune issues. So T cells are basically our soldier cells that that guard our immune system and they are the ones who make the assessment. Is this new substance Friend or foe? Should I sound the alarm and start the immune cascade? Or should we let this go and is this okay for the body? Now, typically, or what the human body is designed to do, what the white blood cells are designed to do, is be on the alert for invaders like virus or bacteria. They do a pretty good job, and especially virus, they do a pretty good job. If we let them go, because their main defenses are heat, inflammation, and then against bacteria, we have a weapon called antibodies. And since COVID has come around in the vaccines, and we talk a lot more about antibodies in the mainstream, we can talk and say, Okay, so the idea of getting the COVID vaccine is that if you have the antibodies in your body, then you are now protected against a future encounter with this virus. Which is exactly right. So when food sensitivity tests are looking for antibodies, it doesn't really make sense. Because that should mean that you are now protected. If you have an antibody to mangoes should mean that you should be able to eat mangoes fine, right? Because you're protected against mangoes, it shouldn't mean that now you must avoid mangoes, but that's how they interpret them. So it doesn't really make sense when they're using antibodies for that. But to go back to the science, so when we release antibodies, their job is to go out into the bloodstream, find the bacteria invaders, handcuff themselves to them, and then the white blood cells and tell me if I'm getting too technical. Now, the white blood cells come along these big white blood cells called macrophages, and B cells and they come along and they basically squirt a substance atom called compliment. I view it as acidic, because its job is to squirt on the handcuffed antibody and bacteria pair to kill them. And then they get swept out through the lymphatic system through the blood. When we send out antibodies, but there is not a bacteria there. Maybe there is a parasite but not a bacteria, or heavy metal or something that is not a bacteria, then these antibodies kind of roam around and the B cells look around, they say well, who are we going to kill now we don't have any handcuff pairs to kill with our complement. And so they end up kind of congregating in what may be a weak point in your body. So like for me, one of my weak points is my eye where I first experienced the big inflammation. And so I can often tell if there's something going on in my body, one of my canary in my coal mines, one of my first signs is that my eyes will start to go a little weird. And I'll be like, oh, there is inflammation it is building now in my body. And it's hitting me first in that weak point. With things like multiple sclerosis, where the problem is, is we have a weak point and it is near a nerve. And the way that nerves work is their synapses. And if we think back to high school science, the synapses kind of have to cross a little bit of an open space, and meet up with the other side in order to send their messages through the nerves into the body to make you move your fingers or do whatever. So when there is a weak spot that is near a nerve, that compliment can still come out, and that acid still burns through the tissues. And now you have a hole in the myelin sheath. And those synapses, just like an old fashioned wire that used to fray, the synapses get lost, they can't make it through because their wire is not insulated like a power cord. So that's where the inflammation causes damage in the body and damage to mobility and functioning and all kinds of things like that. So when we look at inflammation, and how do we treat it naturally, or I look at it as avoiding it naturally. Because if it's, that's what the Western medical community does is they say, Oh, you have inflammation, let's just shut down your whole immune system, right to stop the inflammation. So that well now you're completely unprotected from anything else that might be in the air like a virus or anything like that. So I would rather instead of dealing with the inflammation that's already there, I'd rather stop things that trigger the inflammation to begin with. So if you can avoid those things and not trigger the inflammation, so like celiac patients, once they discover that gluten is their issue and they start avoiding gluten, they stop triggering the inflammation, they live a pretty normal life. Anybody can do that with autoimmunity. You just have to identify the right triggers. And sometimes it's not the most common things like for me my most inflammatory food is lettuce.

Kelsey Harris:

Oh interesting.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

Lettuce. What do you reach for when you're trying to be healthier? A salad right? I can eat spinach and arugula and kale but I just cannot eat anything called lettuce. Because when I do I have MS symptoms and that's where this RMT test is so revolutionary and life changing because it takes all the guesswork out. And it tells us things that we never I never would have pulled lettuce out of my diet thinking it was causing the problems. And it's very hard to do that on your own because sensitivity is can take up to four days to manifest after you've eaten something that's inflammation and inflammation goes everywhere the bloodstream goes. So when you're inflamed, your brain is inflamed too. And that makes it hard to think clearly and logically and makes us revert to the primal core of our brain, those primal instincts of anger or rage, and less logic and compassion.

Kelsey Harris:

I know some of you are totally like me and are hesitant to make any dietary changes, or perhaps even get a food sensitivity test done.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

Like you can tell people that some of the things that you're eating are probably what's keeping you in your debilitated state. But they'll hold on to some idea, some concept that they're gonna have to give up so much. And really, I think this comes from the history in our culture of really radical deprivation diets. And I don't believe in that at all. In fact, I work with my clients, and I tell them, I don't want you to feel deprived, I don't want you to feel hungry. I don't want you to count calories. And I want you to count protein or carbs, I want you to eat as much as you can eat as as much as you want to eat, but only if the items that I tell you that are safe. That's where the limit is going to come. So it's not a limited diet, or a calorie limited diet. It's a restricted diet. So there's going to be lots of foods on there, I'm going to help you figure out how you can make them to your best advantage. For instance, if say, rice is a safe food for you, well, there's rice pasta, there's rice, smelt, there's rice crackers, there's rice krispies, there's right, rice, tortillas, rice, pizza dough, there's all sorts of things made out of rice that you can eat and bring into your world to replace things that are maybe inflammatory for you and not feel deprived. That is my goal. I want you to have cookies and cakes and muffins, and baked goods, but only if they are full of only safe ingredients. When you go carb free, it is not healthy for your body, we need carbs, that's our fuel, that's our energy, and to restrict yourself from all carbs. I hate these fad diets like the Paleo Diet, which I think is so flawed for so many reasons. I could do a whole podcast on that one. But I've had I can't tell you how many clients have come to me and said, Oh, my nutritionist put me on a paleo diet, but I'm still not feeling well. And then we test them. And we find out that they're pretty much reactive to almost every single meat. And they should be on the opposite of a paleo diet more of a carbohydrate diet. Just with the right carbohydrates.

Kelsey Harris:

Elizabeth has some final advice for us.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

My biggest advice is to start reading labels and start trying to avoid anything that's not a real food. And a lot of people, a lot of people even within two weeks, and that's going to mean giving up sodas, right? That's gonna mean giving up a lot of things. And I hate to even bring this one up, but natural flavors. So this is a loophole in the organic world as well as the regular world where and you've probably seen these everywhere on like Lacroix flavored waters they have nothing but water an natural flavors. And you'r like, oh, natural flavors. Tha must be they squeeze a lemon i there. That is not what they do The natural flavors are made u of a chemical stew. And I kno for me when I have somethin that has natural flavors in it I have a variety of reactions ranging from my eyelids startin to peel the next day becaus they get all inflamed to stomac pain to fatigue. So natura flavors could be a culprit. know those are hard to wean of of because they've become s ubiquitous everywhere bu really, especially mainstrea soda, artificial sweeteners anything chemical. If you can d that, that's a great first step

Kelsey Harris:

Are you ready for some lightning round questions

Elizabeth Yarnell:

Throw them at me.

Kelsey Harris:

All right. So what are the top five songs that describe your life?

Elizabeth Yarnell:

Whoo, I've never been asked that question before. I will tell you that I have on my special playlist to psych me up here because that's going to be the easiest way for me to tell you who are even the artist let's see if I can find it. One of my favorite songs that describes my life is anything's possible by Jonny Lang. Kind of a random obscure song but I love it. Because it is anything's possible. You can do anything you put your mind to. I love hope by shaggy because I am an eternal optimist and I feel there is always a solution for everything. I love ABA I'm not necessarily a fan girl of one specific band, but I do. There are bands that I really like.

Kelsey Harris:

Nice. Awesome. But what's one thing you can't go a day without doing?

Elizabeth Yarnell:

flossing?

Kelsey Harris:

What's one thing you plan on doing in your life that you haven't done yet?

Elizabeth Yarnell:

Wow, these are tough questions. One thing that I want to do plan on like from my bucket list. Yeah. I do want to go to Iceland.

Kelsey Harris:

Oh, nice. Yeah, me too. Looks amazing. Describe your perfect day.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

So, my perfect day, I do not use an alarm clock, which I probably use an alarm to wake up three times a year or something like that. So I wake up naturally, and I walk my dog and I put her in my garden, and then hang out at my computer a bit and then hang out with my kids and my husband, and cook dinner. That's probably a perfect day.

Kelsey Harris:

That's lovely. And how do you inspire others to make the most of their lives.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

So one of my mottos is that you'll never get there. And if you never start, I know that people feel very overwhelmed when looking at the big picture and the end goal. And so my feeling is you know what, if you never start, you'll never finish. I started my doctorate program when I was 36 years old. And at that time, I was like, I don't think I'm maybe I'm not even gonna finish. I'm just gonna start taking some classes, because I'm interested in it. And just through plugging away, eventually finished it. It's just amazing how that happens. And so really, I feel like just look at what's right in front of you. And tackle that. Don't think about the end goal, just one step at a time. Yeah, amazing. My other motto is, it's always a new day. So even if today you had doughnuts and cakes, or whatever, and you went completely off the rails. tomorrow's a new day and you have every time you look to put something in your mouth, you have new choices that you can make.

Kelsey Harris:

That's great advice and so true. Where can we find you, follow you, buy y ur cookbo

Elizabeth Yarnell:

Excellent. So I got a lot of different places. My main hub for everything, of course is elizabethyarnell. om. And that's E-L-I-Z-A-B-E-T- -Y-A-R-N-E-L-L .com. But or your listeners, I would love them to go to multiplesc erosisdiet.com and they can rece ve my top three things that th y can look to avoid when the have multiple sclerosis or any other autoimmune issue. And if ou're interested in my coo book, glorious one pot meals.c m And that's glorious Like hallelujah. G-L-O-R-I- -U-S one spelled out O-N-E pot meals .com. And if you go t ere, I'll give you a free chec list. The ultimate checklist fo stocking your freezer and antry for quick and easy whole ood spac

Kelsey Harris:

Amazing. Thank you so much for coming on to this has been lovely.

Elizabeth Yarnell:

Hey Kelsey, thanks so much for having me. I really enjoyed being on this podcast.

Kelsey Harris:

This week's Patreon content is a little more on parasites and their implication in autoimmune disease, which is a part of the conversation that did not make this episode, sign up by following the link in the bio and getting bonus content every week. I really liked having Elizabeth on the show because rather than focus on a specific diet to help with inflammation, her approach is to individualize the diet to each person. I think this makes sense because pretty much everything when it comes to health should be individualized to each person. As a therapist, I don't like to use protocols with clients because they're too rigid and don't necessarily reflect what the individual needs in the moment. So why would I want to do anything different for myself. That being said, I will happily continue to explore other diets on the show because again, we are all individuals so you might really relate to something specific. Okay, let's reflect. What did you notice about your thoughts and feelings as you listen to this episode? What are you noticing now but you're noticing? Thank you everyone for tuning in and keep making the most of it. Special thanks to marred.e for the original music nd Charity Williams for he original artw