Chronically Living and how to make the most of it

What If Our Chronic Pain is Muscular? with Dr. Mitchell Yass

November 01, 2021 Kelsey Harris, Dr. Mitchell Yass Season 2 Episode 19
Chronically Living and how to make the most of it
What If Our Chronic Pain is Muscular? with Dr. Mitchell Yass
Show Notes Transcript

TW: mentions of suicide

We're usually told by our doctors that the causes of our chronic pain are related to joints. This is often verified by the use of an MRI. But for some people, nothing shows up on an MRI. And for others, what shows up has nothing to do with their symptoms. My guest Dr. Mitchell Yass introduces us to his Yass Method for diagnosing and treating pain.
In this episode we talk about:

  • causes of  pain
  • diagnosing pain
  • the Yass Method

Guest Bio:
Dr. Mitchell Yass is a physical therapist and the developer of the Yass Method. This method interprets the body’s presentation of symptoms to identify the tissue in distress eliciting those very symptoms. Chronic pain affects 130 million Americans and roughly 1,000,000,000 people worldwide. The primary cause of chronic pain is misdiagnosis. This is directly associated with the baseless use of the MRI. He can provide theoretical, clinical and scientific evidence to substantiate my position. I have treated thousands of people resolving their pain even after surgery failed.
Check out his YouTube Channel: Dr.  Mitchell Yass
Follow him on Facebook @The Yass Method
Follow him on Instagram @live_without_pains
Check out his website: livewithoutpains.com
Email him: [email protected]

Follow the show on Instagram @chronically.living_
Follow the show on Facebook @chronically living
Follow the show on Twitter @janevspain
Support the show on Patreon.

Kelsey Harris:

Have you ever been to the doctor and they haven't really listened to your symptoms? only looked at the test results? Are you frustrated with your chronic pain? And though you're using heating pads or taking hot baths? so on, you're finding it's just temporary relief? Would you like to hear about an alternative theory to the cause of your pain? If you answered yes to any or all of these questions, then listen into what physical therapists Dr. Mitchell Yass has to say this week on chronically living. I'm Kelsey Harris, chronic illness warrior and psychotherapist on chronically living and how to make the most of it, we're providing tangible ways to improve the well being of spoonies. So get ready to make the most out of your life even with that pesky chronic illness.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

My name is Mitchell, Yass, I have a doctorate in physical therapy. That's the basis of my credential. I live in Jacksonville, Florida. But the thing that I have done is develop a method to properly diagnose and treat pain and other symptoms by interpreting the body's presentation of symptoms, which is why that tissue in distress creates those symptoms to make you aware of which tissue it is. And once you know what tissue rage resolve, the distress of it no longer has to elicit your symptoms and your pain free and fully functional. So my first career, I was a project manager in construction. I have a Bachelor's of building construction from the University of Florida. I did it for five years. And it just wasn't satisfying. I didn't see myself, I think a future in it. Three, four years prior to me quitting, calling it quits in there, I had started lifting weights. And I kind of took a high school physics course and started applying physics to weightlifting. And it allowed me over a series of years to put on over four years, I put 40 pounds of muscle on and it was this great job, this great sideline thing that I was doing. As I quit construction, my parents mentioned that some of their friends, kids had been physical therapists, and I literally had never even heard of it. So I found out what was required. And it turns out, all I needed was six prerequisites. I took that over a year and I have a period of time at a community college. And I then got into physical therapy school. And basically what happened was very quickly into it, I started to recognize I was 30 years old. So I wasn't an 18 year old kid. And I had a lot of life experience and really kind of understood logic. And what they were saying just wasn't making sense. So I said, You know what, I'll just pass the courses, get through the curriculum, and then I'll try to figure it out, as I begin to practice therapy, and that's kind of the process that developed in that's how the whole thing began.

Kelsey Harris:

Part of physical therapy is of course, working with people who are in pain. This can range from acute pain, from an accident to chronic pain. I was interested in why Mitchell decided to focus on the chronic pain portion.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

A big part of my whole life was always the sense that I always wanted to have my own business. It was always there. From the time I was a kid, there was a fascination with the idea of being in charge and controlling things. And so I thought that I was going to have my own construction company. And when that didn't work out and I got into physical therapy, the primary mechanism for someone to have their own business was an outpatient facility, you're going to do outpatient therapy, you're not going to do stroke patients or amputees and things like that it's going to be outpatient, and most of what's treated in outpatient was pain. That's why most people are going for outpatient treatment. So it just wasn't natural inclination. I worked for a guy for a year and a half. And right after that, I opened my facility and got instant recognition for my diagnostic capacity. And it just blew up. And so it just turned out that because the area that I was treating was primarily pain. I entrenched myself in trying to understand the old school version of pain before the word diagnostic test, which was like, What is pain? Why does the tissue elicit pain? How can you figure out what tissue that is? And that became really the essence of everything I wanted to do and I just went on the process of understanding it.

Kelsey Harris:

Okay, so what was it about what Mitchell was being trained on in physical therapy school that didn't make sense to him? And how does this tie into his diagnostic method and treatment of chronic pain.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

So the thrust of when it comes to the issue of pain in terms of establishing a diagnosis since the late mid to late 1980s was the use of the MRI to identify a tissue that supposedly was the tissue creating symptoms. And so a classic classic example of what would happen on a student. And it turns out the last affiliation I had was with the guy who was the therapist for the New York Islanders hockey team, I was in New York, and I was 30 years old, I was pretty brash, pretty aggressive, and the guy like that, so he was going to hire me within two weeks in my affiliation, he said, I'm gonna hire you right after I love you, you are perfect for what we do to sports oriented place, lots of people coming in. And so the concept was that someone would come in, let's say they had pain in the knee area, and they would get an MRI and it would say they have a torn meniscus. So that's what they were coming for therapy for. And I still am not quite sure why every person who graduates who begins to treat people wouldn't want to ask this question, but it was the first question that came to my mind. Could you just tell me what your pain is? I just asked this those to me the most logical, Could you just tell me point to where your pain is. And so what would happen is they point to where their pain is. And it was like in the knee region, but it wasn't where the meniscus exists. And so I was left to say, oh, they've got pain, and it's not from the meniscus, what is it? And so I started doing the process of trying to determine things like, Well, let me feel for where they're having the pain, what is that tissue that I'm touching? And it would turn out it's a muscle and I'd say, Okay, well, if this is a muscle, let me muscle test it and see, and it would be weak, let me flexibility tested, it would be short, let me see them try to stand or do activities on it, and they wouldn't be able to. And I suddenly come to the realization Oh my god, that pain is just a strained hamstring. So I do a little massage, I do some strengthening and within two to three treatments, the person's pain free. And there was this massive quandary that begins to develop in me, I am being told that this person's pain is being caused by something found on an MRI, and the presentation of their symptoms is saying that's not right. What do you do about that? And so the most logical thing to me was, well, if the symptoms are real, those are what's being created by the tissue in distress. That should be what you treat any place from head to toe, I started really focusing on the symptoms, asking the person questions about it, touching, trying to figure out that tissue. And ultimately, it came down to a simple question, is it a structural element which needs surgery? Or is it muscle, and within a very short period of time, I established that more than 98% of cases more pain, being experienced, the causes muscle

Kelsey Harris:

Wait, it's muscle? That often? Because that's the one most of us with pain issues are told, regardless of what is causing our pain. Let's hear a bit more.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

I've actually established the four primary mechanisms by which muscle can create pain, as you would see that if someone's having pain, it's actually their situation fits into this. So number one, you could have pain, the muscle strains, and it elicits pain in the muscle, okay, pain in the upper trap region. It's your strained levator scapula, okay, it's a muscle, you just have to understand that that muscle works with other muscles to perform activity. So you have to figure out which of the muscles may have strained to cause that muscle to strain and elicit pain. So you just strengthen muscles as a group, make sure things work functionally, you resolve that pain, that's kind of the most obvious one. This is where people really start to say, I would have never thought that could be from muscles. So let's say you're having pain around your kneecap, right, the pain is at your joint around your kneecap, you would then get an MRI to find some structural variation and it would be asserted that the structure of the knee joint is creating the pain. What you have done the stand is that the position of the kneecap in the knee joint is controlled by the quadriceps muscle, the muscle that sits at the front the device connected to your kneecap. So let's say there was a muscular deficit. Let's say that the quad got to stronger relationship to the hamstring the back darn muscle. Well if it shortens, because if it's attachment to the kneecap, it's going to pull up on it excessively. So when you bend your knee instead of the kneecap gliding of the joint, it's compressed into joint that would elicit pain at the knee joint. The cause, though, is muscular. So pain at a joint, in almost all cases has nothing to do with the structure of the joint. It's based on weakness or imbalance of muscle that attaches to the joint, causing the misalignment of the joint surfaces. They're rubbing in a way they shouldn't. That's why you have Joint region pain a muscular cause. Next we have muscle can refer symptoms. Everybody thinks only nerves can refer symptoms well muscles can. How would you know that the jaw? Well, what's the symptom of a heart attack pain at the chest and the left arm? Is there anything wrong with your left arm? No. The symptom at the left arm is literally coming from the heart itself, it's being referred from the muscle. So muscles can refer symptoms the hardest muscles so the person who's having numbness when they sleep on their side, in their hand, the numbness is actually referred from a part of the rotator cuff, which attaches from the shoulder blade to the arm. Because it's weak, the arm bone gets drawn forward in appropriately over stretching that muscle and it causes it to ignite a symptom numbness in the hand. So just because you have numbness doesn't mean you should immediately get a cervical spine, MRI, find a herniated disk and assume it's that muscle can refer symptoms. Finally, the biggest muscle constrain and impinge on a nerve. That is sciatica. sciatica has nothing to do with the lumbar spine, nothing. But it is a hip dysfunction issue where a muscle in the butt actually strange due to weakness of another muscle relating to hip function. And that muscle thickens and impinges on the sciatic nerve. So you're going to get a neurological symptom, pain from the butt down the back of the leg to the foot, but it is caused by a muscle impinging on the nerve. There's nothing structurally wrong with this ionic nerve. So if I fix the muscular deficit, I stopped the muscle from impinging on the nerve, I stopped the experience of the neurological symptom. When you look at those four mechanisms, you would see that accounts for 90 of any person could walk in my door. And I'm going to tell you one of those four mechanisms are what are creating their symptoms in over 98% of cases.

Kelsey Harris:

I asked this question at the start of the show. Have you ever been to the doctor and they haven't really listened to your symptoms only looked at the test results, whether those come from bloodwork or an MRI, or an X ray, or whatever I have. So this is really interesting.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

This was the 1950s or the 1960s. If people are old enough, I'm old enough to remember this show like Marcus Welby, those doctor shows where you would walk in, and the guy would say like, Where's your pain? Show me what makes it happen. Let me touch you and test you and feel you. And then came diagnostic testing the MRI. And it became the gold standard, by the way, kind of important little detail. The MRI wasn't designed wasn't invented to identify the cause of pain was it was invented to identify tumors in the brain. That's what its original intent was, how it shifted to being used to identify the cause of pain. That's a great mystery. And I would love that to be investigated. Because there were no studies done at the time to say, Wow, there is this direct correlation between structural variations and pain. In fact, by 1994, the first studies on people with no back pain showed 70% of people who have no back pain have herniated or bulging discs. 70%. Okay, so it became the gold standard, and for whatever the reason, that's it, so you're going 40 years now forward, and it doesn't really matter. The specialist you go to the standard of care is to say, where's your pain? Okay, here's a prescription get an MRI, we'll discuss the results when you get them. And all determinations about what's causing your pain are based on that MRI. The fact is, and this is another kind of big issue to understand is that this is known as correlative theory or junk science. It simply says that, if you have pain, and a structural variation is identified at the time of your pain, I will assert that it is the cause of your pain. Well, I could show you that's kind of a fallacy because the MRI would show that you have two elbows at the time you have pain. I can show you the picture of your two elbows, you have two elbows you do when you have pain. So why can I say having two elbows is the cause of your pain? And I'll remove your elbows, I can do that. Right. The point to understand is that if it is the cause of pain, then what would you expect for people who don't have pain, then they shouldn't have herniated disk? Well, it turns out studies have shown as many people without pain in the same percentages have the same structural variations as those in pain.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, interesting. What about the people who go in for an MRI and it shows nothing which right so often, right?

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

That's, I mean, just think about what you're saying? How frustrating that is to the individual because you went to the doctor, the doctors got to say something. He's got to give you something, right? You're paying for the visit. So just imagine how difficult it is for that doctor when nothing shows up. Air go fibromyalgia, huh? Yeah, all of these types of disease, oh, you have something something something syndrome, right? That's what those diagnoses are, therefore, it's for when I can provide a structure as the cause of your pain, but I still got to give you a diagnosis. I'm gonna fall into that. What is the diagnosis, I really want people to understand this, this is really, really important stuff. What is the purpose of a diagnosis, the purpose of the diagnosis is the recognition that a tissue is in distress, creating your symptoms. So the diagnosis is there has to be a tissue, you have a kidney stone, you have pneumonia of the lung, you have a mitral valve prolapse of the heart, you got to identify a tissue. And the second part of the diagnosis must be that the symptoms being experienced, must be the same symptoms that that identified structural variation would create. If it was in distress, you need those two things to have a proper diagnosis. So if you are getting a diagnosis, like people get in car accidents all the time, and they get a whiplash. Now, I think I know anatomy pretty well. I don't think there's a tissue named whiplash. I don't think so I'm pretty sure. So I can't accept that as a diagnosis. But it happens all the time. And people were treated for the next 20 years under the diagnosis whiplash, you must see the fallacy the danger in that diagnosis, watch the tissue in distress. So I could address the distress of that tissue, which is the only way I'm ever going to stop the tissue from creating your symptoms. That type of diagnosis kind of allows the person to stay in treatment for ever and ever and ever. So if you want to protect yourself, if you really want to take control of your symptoms, your ability to resolve your symptoms, stop being proactive, stop taking control of what's happening to and understand that you gotta get a diagnosis before you can get any treatment that's going to resolve your symptoms. And that diagnosis must be a tissue and must be a tissue that would create symptoms that are exactly the symptoms you're experiencing. If you have that you have a good diagnosis, what does the Yosh method do? it interprets the body's presentation of symptoms to identify what tissues in distress, in 98% of cases, it's muscle. And the symptoms aren't just pain, it could be your posture movement was the range of motion a variety of things, but I'm interpreting what the body's telling me because that tissue was so desperately trying to get help. That's the way the body works. If the tissues in distress, it calls out to you to say, please help me fix me. I'm going to try to let you know it's me by showing you these specific symptoms, try to interpret them. That's what this is.

Kelsey Harris:

Okay, let's pause for a moment of catch up. If you listen to the episode with Sam visnyk, you might remember that he said something similar about MRIs. It seems like doctors overly rely on MRI results, even though the results may or may not be showing the cause of the problems we're experiencing. This is pretty interesting. The second thing I wanted to mention was when Dr. Yass mentioned correlative research. So correlations are important because they show an association between A and B. The problem is that they don't show cause and effect. is a causing B, or is B causing a? Or is there a C that's also implicated in causing a and or B. This is why when correlations are found, usually additional research is needed to make a determination of cause and effect if at all possible.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

The essence of that is understanding the bigger picture of why would a muscle go into stress. And that is because we live in a gravitational environment. So there's always a force being applied down on us. So every activity do we do have to push up against that force. And so the muscles have to create an equivalent force the all the muscles trying to perform the activity. If certain muscles can create that voice, then they're going to strain and elicit symptoms. So the only real way to resolve muscular causes Pain by identifying the muscles that do not have the appropriate force output, and then causing them to adapt to greater and greater resistances through a use of progressive resistance, it could be resistance bands, dumbbells, barbells machines, whatever mechanism, you have to create resistance, ultimately, you just have to make those muscles adapt to greater and greater resistances until that force output is greater than the force requirements of your activities. And you at that point, are pain free and fully functional. And as long as you sustain the exercises, you are now preventing yourself from ever having those symptoms again.

Kelsey Harris:

Okay, so earlier Dr. Yass mentioned when you sleep on your arm, and it becomes numb, which is something that happens to me all the time, but how can I go about fixing this?

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

In my mind, the first thing is to become more willing to recognize that maybe the cause is muscular, right? You've just gotten a light bulb moment, you now know that that's muscular. So granted, yeah, you would probably have to go to someone like me and have one session with me to figure out which muscles they are. But the great news about my method is that it can be done through zoom session and the sessions of videotape. This is, to me the most important thing about the way this works. So I videotape our session, I show you which exercise to do, you perform the exercises under my supervision, then that videotape is sent to you. So now you use that you do your exercises only three times a week, it's not seven days a week, no one should strengthen seven days a week, three times a week, you do the right exercises, progressive resistance, and you utilize that to make sure it's almost like I'm with you, every time you're going to do the exercise, because you're utilizing the tape that I showed you what to do, and I confirm that you doing get on the tape, you're doing it correctly. So that would be the mechanism by which you would be able to resolve your symptoms in the cheaper function. I wish there was a magic answer. Like I could say just do these three exercises, you know, everyone with neck pain, they'll get rid of it, it doesn't work like that the body is a group of muscles working synergistically. And each person can have a certain breakdown of a couple of muscles that are specific to their situation. So there always has to be that initial evaluation to confirm which particular muscles are involved in creating your symptoms. If you strengthen the wrong muscles, you will certainly not resolve the distress of the ones responsible for your symptoms. But you may also be heightening the problem. So I really feel like the best message I can give people is to be more open to the idea that maybe your pain is muscular that all that stuff you're being told by the quote unquote, medical establishment is coming from a place where they have one train of thought, right? If you've been through the medical establishment, you know that they primarily think that the answer can be found through the MRI diagnostic, that's thing. You know how you said that you're having that numbness from sleeping on your shoulder, and we're assuming gets muscular. So if I took an MRI of your shoulder with that muscular deficit show up? Yeah. But let's say that a little arthritis in your shoulder showed up. What do you think they're gonna treat that arthritis. And the key is that that muscular deficit, that's there stays there. Yeah, no matter how much they treat that arthritis, that's going to stay there until you identify it, and resolve it. So if someone has pain somewhere, and they take a hot shower, and the pain goes away, that's a red flag that you have a muscular deficit, if you get massages, you have neck pain, or migraine headaches, and the you get a massage and the pain goes away. That's a red flag that your pain is muscular. If you find that doing activity brings on your symptoms, that's a red flag that your problem is muscular. If I could just get people to be a little more rope into that idea, and that I know what's terrible the thing that there's just one guy out there crazy guy who seems to have figured this out, and everybody else is saying something else. But a lot of times the crazy guys the right guy. And all I'm asking anyone to do is never to follow what I say because I say it. I want you to listen to it. And if it makes sense, follow it. And that's all I ever ask from anybody. I come on this podcast, because I want to provide information. I want people to hear what I have to say it's clearly an alternative to pretty much anything. But if it's based on logic, how could it be disputed? Why would you not be at least willing to give it a shot When what they're offering is kind of scary shots, epidural nerve blocks, radio, the one of the big ones out there that radio frequency ablation, that's cauterizing your nerves, right? Obviously multiple surgeries and things like that. Why not look at this and say to myself, I don't know, man, maybe. I don't know if it's right. I don't know if it's wrong, but at least the guy sounds like he's making sense. And what he's talking about kind of sounds similar to my situation. It's worth the investigation.

Kelsey Harris:

I mean, I don't know about all of you. But at least some of this makes sense to me. I know that I feel better. After massages, hot baths, you're using heating pads. And I've heard many, many other people with chronic pain, including pain associated with chronic illnesses, see that they also use these things to help with their pain. In that case, it does sound like at least part of the P must be muscular. For one of Dr. Yass's, client success stories, head on over to Patreon. become a patron of chronically living for only $5 a month and get bonus content for each episode of the podcast as well. Some other great perks. So is there anything else we should know about The Yass Method,

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

so the easiest way to get it is just to go to my website live without pains, it's plural, live ithoutpains.com and if you w nt to put slash sessions, y u'll get to the page, which s ows you about the zoom s ssions. I think, to me, that's t e most important thing to u derstand. I live in J cksonville, Florida, you don't h ve to come here. For this. I h ve been doing zoom sessions b fore there was even zoom I was d ing when there was only Skype. B cause for various reasons I h d awareness made of me around t e world. And so I've been d ing this for a pretty long t me, it's a highly effective m nner, the success rate is e tremely high. And the great n ws is you can schedule the s ssions at a day in time when i comfortable for you. And we j st go through when as I said t ey're videotaped. And in terms o equipment, you need a r sistance band, and the chair f r around the 10 bucks of e pense. I can get you out of p in and pain free. If you want t . If it sounds like maybe this i something you're interested i , you could always email me at m email address, which is drmit [email protected] I'll always nswer Don't hesitate and think 'm not going to respond, I do ev rything in my power to respond o every person that seeks my, y help, I think it's an ethi al and moral responsibility. So I think those are th two big things you can reach me by email or if you want to mak an appointment, go for it, you ill see the results that I spe k of the success rate I get s very, very high into the upper 90.

Kelsey Harris:

Okay, so let's do our lightning round questions. Alright, so what are the top five songs that describe your life? All right,

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

so the number one is by disturbed called indestructible. And that is because I think I have to be that way it is me against the system. And that's what the the song mentions is that you got to be indestructible, you can't be taken down. No matter what it takes, you keep getting that message out there, you keep getting that message known, people are going to get the benefit of it, and you're going to change the world. So I definitely think I am and want to be indestructible. The next one is Van Halen right now. And that's actually not as long for me. It's my message that every single person in the world suffering from chronic pain, you could get out of pain right now, you simply need the right diagnosis. You got to figure out what tissue would if it's if it's muscle really easy. So exercise, understanding how to progress resistance, you can get out of pain starting right now. Next is Frank Sinatra my way. Well, I mean, I don't I don't know how anyone could say that. I don't do what I do my way. It's, it's clearly my way I made it up after I got out of school. So I think that one's pretty reasonable. Now from a personal experience, I can see clearly now by Johnny Nash, and that actually has to do with all the craziness I've gone through over these almost three decades, I have actually found enlightenment Personally, I have been able to now detach myself as a person from this method. And I see life extremely clearly I live in a fully enlightened as close to enlightened as I can get. I live for the moment. I find joy in everything I do. Life is simply there to relish every moment and do everything in your power to be able to achieve that so I could see you later on. Clearly and then the result of that is Three Dog Night, Joy to the world. All I'm trying to do is bring joy to the world, one person at a time that that's I think, I get the greatest satisfaction out of doing and I love it. And I want to continue to do it forever. My five songs,

Kelsey Harris:

Love it. Love it. What's one thing you can't go a day without doing? Sorry, just hold on a sec. Yeah, we'll just try that again. There. Yeah, I put all my stuff on Do Not Disturb, but apparently didn't matter. What's one, one thing you can't go a day without doing?

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

One thing I can't go adab doing is getting up first thing in the morning, usually about sunrise, getting a cup of coffee, sitting outside and admiring the beauty that exists, whether it's trees, the sky birds, I take one hour, every morning, every morning, I do this. And I start the day. Simply recognizing and relishing the granddaughter of life and how simple joy can be achieved by looking at a bird feeling the breeze go by. And I think what it does is it starts my day off with such an optimistic sense of life that I'm going to go into anything I'm going to do in a really, really happy positive mindset. And I've been doing it now for probably close to two years now. And I wake up every day happy. I mean, I really am so fortunate to feel so joyful. And I just think it's a lovely way to stop the day. So that's something I do every day

Kelsey Harris:

is what's one thing you plan on doing in your life that you haven't yet.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

So with all the craziness I've done, I actually began I became a private pilot. And I have my private pilot's license. But I haven't gotten my instrument rating yet. So ultimately, I want to complete that. And I want to slowly get back and have flying be a big part of my life I for those who have never flown a plane, it is a rush. It is a rush. It is a sense of power that's overwhelming. And I've actually had my 15 year old daughter in the plane with me. And so you can kind of put it on cruise control for a little bit as auto pilot. And I have chances where I've looked over and I look at her staring at the ground, right three to 4000 feet. And she has her airbags on and she's listening to music, and I can just see the aura in her face of what's around her. And to be able to share that with her is really great. And I hate to say it, but landing a plane is a pretty amazing thing, that sense of control. And when you do it right. And the wheels, touchdown, right? It's incredible. So I definitely want to get back to that hopefully in the next couple of months and just make it a bigger pot of my life.

Kelsey Harris:

Nice. Yeah, definitely sounds like a rush for sure. Describe your perfect day.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

This might sound goofy to people, but it's every day, every day is a perfect day to me for the last two years. The only way to describe it is I'm drinking the cup of coffee I am in the moment, it's the greatest cup of coffee I've ever tasted. I'm doing a podcast with you. It's the greatest podcast I've ever done. I'm filling in the moment, I'm enjoying talking to you and spreading the word I go to work out. It's the greatest workout I've ever done. Because I'm fully engaged in it, I'm driving in my car, listening to music, it doesn't really matter what I do. When you finally find that point at which you could be so fully engaged in the moment you're experiencing every moment, you're not thinking about things which prevent you from experiencing the moment. So I'm feel very blessed that I've reached this point. And so I literally wake up kind of with my feet off the floor, and I kind of go to bed every night with my feet off the floor. I feel very fortunate. And so I'm lucky that I've gotten to the point where literally I it's crazy, but every day is a great day. It's a perfect day. That's amazing. It's very lucky, I feel very blessed. And it's a part of my life that although what this is the focus, people would be surprised you get into these zoom sessions with people, this is kind of gonna come out a little bit because pain has such a strong emotional attachment to it. And I don't think I can really address someone's pain fully until I understand what is their emotional connection to it. And how do we begin to make them sense that maybe there's going to be a day in the future where pain is not going to be a part of their life and they can just as I am be free to experience every moment so I usually have a little bit of the session. I'm involved in talking about the connection of the motion, spirit, intellect, all of it to the pain that they have. And so I feel very again fortunate that I've, in my personal life found this freedom. And I kind of like to share it with people love that.

Kelsey Harris:

How do you inspire your clients to make the most of their lives?

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

I think it's recognizing that there's a lot of stuff that happens to people, bad stuff, health related stuff, relationship related stuff, I get it, well, I was crippled for a decade, if there a lot of bad stuff happened to me. And I think the best way to inspire people is if you're looking at the trees, you're looking outside, you're recognizing clouds go by. And amazingly, another cloud comes by, you could see leaves dying, and you could see leads growing, the cycle of life is constant, it's constantly flowing, you're going to go through bad times, but I promise you, they will end when you're going through good times, relish them, because bad times are gonna come again. And so if you could recognize that these things are all temporary, and the best way to stay in a healthy mindset is to kind of stay in the middle and say, hey, it's all good right now. And I'm happy and I'm relishing it. And when it's bad, say, okay, it stinks a little bit, but I know that's gonna pass to your get, you have the best chance of experiencing the best in life. And that's kind of my message, I deal in pain. I mean, every person ideal with his pain, and it can be I treated people, hundreds who were suicidal, who literally said to me, came to me and said, You are my last resort, I will put a bullet in my head tomorrow, if this is it, I can't live another day like this. So why becoming gross, and the whole psychology of this stuff. I've had a decade of trauma. But thank God, I found this path to enlightenment. And that enlightenment is what I really want to share with people not just in resolving their pain, but knowing everything you're going through, has closure, everything. Because ultimately, there is one final closure and that we die. And so no matter what you've gone through at some point, you're going to get there, and everything else isn't going to really matter at that point. So I inspire people, I believe by making them see that they could live a phenomenal quality of life by keeping perspective and recognizing that control of the things that are around you are a lot more in your control than you really recognize and the things that you can control. Let it go, man, let it go. Just do what you could do to make yourself happy. And and you're gonna have a great life.

Kelsey Harris:

That's amazing. I totally resonates with me. Amazing. So you mentioned your website earlier, do you have any social media we can follow you on. So

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

My YouTube channel is Dr. Mitchell Yass. An there's got to be a couple o 100 videos there. It's all fre content. It's all application So I've written articles, one o the big ones was on trigge finger. And it was for a organization called bottom lin health. And I get so many email of people saying I use th exercises that resolve my pain What kind of crazy person give this information out for fre and doesn't want to get paid fo it? And the answer is becaus I'm more a scientist than I am businessman. And that's alway been my joy. So I provid content constantly. So there' the website, there's the YouTub channel, Dr. Mitchell Yass. F cebook is The Yass Method. Inst gram is live_ without_pains. T ere's my blog on my websi e, the website, again, is live without pains, calm, I've w itten three books, overpo er pain, the painkiller Rx, th gas method for pain free moveme t. So there's lots of lots and lots of lots and contents availa le. And I would recommend anybo y if you feel your concern, you on't know if this is really viab e for you and you want to loo at things before you make an a pointment for a zoom sess on. Definitely, to me, the YouT be channel is the best way the e's so much content there. And gain, that's just Dr. Mitc ell. Yass.

Kelsey Harris:

Perfect. I'll make sure that's linked in the show notes as well.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

Oh, great. Th nk you that that would be wond rful.

Kelsey Harris:

Mitchell, thank you so much for coming on. I really appreciate this. I think you've given us some great knowledge and things to think about.

Dr. Mitchell Yass:

Thank you. I appreciate you having me and it's been a pleasure. And let's help everyone get out of pain. Everyone deserves to be there and to reclaim their lives and be happy. So Thank you for having me.

Kelsey Harris:

One of the reasons I like asking the lightning round questions at the end of the episodes is that we usually get some great extra nuggets of information for improving our well being and quality of life. I think Mitchell gave us two of them. So first, he mentioned that he lives in the moment. And obviously mindfulness is a huge part of his life and his well being. And as I've said many, many times before on this podcast, it has improved mine and many others that I've seen as well. So just keep that in mind if you're not currently practicing any mindfulness. Second, he mentioned that pain has a strong emotional attachment to it. And this is very true. It's usually what stops us from being mindful. It often comes with depression and or anxiety. However, there are many ways to detach from that emotional attachment, like last week's episode on separating ourselves from our illness thoughts. Okay, so let's reflect. What did you notice about your thoughts and feelings as you listen to this episode? particularly about pain being muscular in many cases? What are you noticing now about that noticing? Everyone, thanks as always for tuning in. I hope this week you keep making the most of it. Special thanks to marred.e for the original music nd Charity Williams for he original artwo