Chronically Living and how to make the most of it

How Do I Achieve a Sense of Accomplishment with Chronic Illness? with Darren Radke

September 20, 2021 Kelsey Harris, Darren Radke Season 2 Episode 13
Chronically Living and how to make the most of it
How Do I Achieve a Sense of Accomplishment with Chronic Illness? with Darren Radke
Show Notes Transcript

Feeling that sense of accomplishment is linked to well-being, but many Spoonies struggle to feel that because they are limited in their daily activities. If this sounds like you, then in tune in because APS and Lupus Warrior, Darren Radke shares how he manages to feel a sense of accomplishment often, despite having two chronic illnesses.
In this episode we talk about:

  • two coping skills: music and exercise
  • what gives Darren feelings of accomplishment
  • how having fun is important for the well-being of chronic illness warriors
  • Darren's new book, Deceived From Within

Guest Bio
Darren Radke is a 49 year old male, from Marshall, Wisconsin. Proud Husband and a Father of two. He has an Associates Degree in Business Management. Loves to exercise when his body allows, study history, music enthusiast and a huge Green Bay Packers fan. First time Author with hopes to help others living with Invisible Chronic Illnesses.
Check out Darren's website: www.deceivedfromwithin.com
Follow Darren on Instagram @deeradke_apsandlupus

Follow the show on Instagram @chronically.living_
Check out the companion blog: www.chronically-living.com
Support the show on Patreon.

Kelsey Harris:

When's the last time you felt the sense of accomplishment? What do you normally do to experience that? How about going out and having fun? Is that something you neglect doing? These two things are essential to well being when you have a chronic illness. But hey, don't take it from me. lupus and APS warrior and author Darren Radke takes us through this part of our well being journey on this week's episode of chronically living. I'm Kelsey Harris, chronic illness warrior and psychotherapist on chronically living and how to make the most of it, we're providing tangible ways to improve the well being of spoonies. So get ready to make the most out of your life, even with that pesky chronic illness.

Darren Radke:

I'm from Marshall, Wisconsin, which is just east of Madison to capitol, 49 years old. And right now I'm on disability. So I'm trying to be a full time parent, trying to be as good as long as I can.

Kelsey Harris:

This is Darren, and he's had a long journey to get a diagnosis. And then of course, the journey doesn't really end once the diagnosis comes. I'm sure many of you can relate. I asked him to take us through a bit of that journey.

Darren Radke:

In April of 2000, I ended up having two blood clots. One in my right clavicle, one in my left lung, hospitalized for a couple of days. At that point I was diagnosed as lupus anticoagulant, with for pretty generic. And from November of 2006, April 2007, I suffered three seizures. At that point, they diagnosed me with epilepsy, even though they really didn't do any testing beyond the diagnosis. So again, I felt pretty generous. After switching neurologists, cause I was kind of set up, I was asked to research, the APS Foundation of America website was changed my life forever. I had helped by person's name of Tina Pohlman. And with her help, she helped me make a change in doctors and location. And within five months, I was diagnosed with both acsm moves. That was back in 2012. And then, throughout that time, you know, going through a lot of natural things in my body, and kind of led me up to writing a book about it.

Kelsey Harris:

I'm gonna have Darren talk a bit more about his book later. But first, I decided to ask about APS. Now I've read their book. So I know what it is, but I hadn't heard of it before reading the book. So I figured some of you probably have the same question. What is APS?

Darren Radke:

Let's call this antiphilosophid syndrome. For me as a male affects my blood. You know what class, there also has the ability to neurological issues, which are similar to Ms, which I set that bill perfectly. Now unfortunately, a lot of that really does, you know, affect the lungs that also affects heart. But for women, it is a lot worse. Unfortunately, for women where they do go through you know, the diagnosis really, with APS or lupus. APS was actually something I was hoping for. I know that sounds kind of weird, but that that time I was going through disability getting timed out, getting going and always running into a lot of issues. And being diagnosed with APS certainly helped get me on that path. The lupus, came as a surprise. I wasn't expecting them to when they looked at my lab, you know, I was just over where I got the official diagnosis of lupus. So that is sell for, like I said, studying, but that has progressively gotten worse. And now it's to the point where doing Labs is almost always the time of the numbering 40% of people who do have lupus have APS and a lot of them may not know that might be a head scratcher and hopefully you know Give some people a little bit of hope of finding, you know, maybe you don't do have extra issues going on with their bodies.

Kelsey Harris:

I originally invited Darren on the show to talk about the two coping skills he uses that he talks about in his book, as sometimes happens, I found a totally different theme through the conversation. But let's start with his first coping skill, music,

Darren Radke:

I have always been a music fan, kind of being a genetic, you know, Generation X, I grew up on MTV, all the one hit wonder or to hit wonder, you know, always grew up like in that eventually got exposed to a little in a heavier direction. To me, I like the way the lyrics and the music sounding everything, you know, those kind of things that propelled me to love it so much. And a lot of it that I looked into, you know, really has the attitude behind that and things that you can relate. And those are the things that I get along. And nowadays, there's really not a whole lot of bands that I'm really blown away by. And I find myself rather than listening to, you know, a lot of the oldies, and that kind of goes hand in hand with my whitelisting annoying, because that's just a way to forget about life for a while we doing how you know housework or stuff like that I got headphones on listening to music, and, you know, just tune everything out.

Kelsey Harris:

Like what Darren says about finding something in song lyrics that you can relate to. I do the same thing. Much like Darren I love music. And it's a wonderful way to process almost indirectly. Darrin mentions that he uses his coping skills to distract. But I'm actually going to make a different argument about how he uses them based on what I actually heard during the interview. That conversation, I kind of listened with my counseling ear on, though I didn't actually mention my interpretation to him during the interview. The other coping skill I wanted to talk about is exercise because he wrote a lot about it in his book. And I know that while we've talked about it on the show, before the information has always been coming from healthcare professionals, I wanted to chronic illness worries experienced with it to be shared,

Darren Radke:

I started way back in 1990. I know I did a little before that when I was still in high school, I still get a little listing, but nowhere near when I first started making money in it didn't make one, I got four. And now I've been doing resistance training. I have a Bowflex to my basement, then using that. Well over a dozen years, what I have is probably well, I would date it, but it worked. You know, I just love that feeling of accomplishment. You know, no matter how big or little it is, it just brightens up your day, you know, like, you're working hard towards the goal and you reach that goal. And you're like, Yeah, it's great. Even though I can push myself very hard, as much as I used to, I have a heart nail here too. But to me, it's just a great way to forget about life for a while, you know, you focus on what you're doing. That may seem like a no brainer, but you got to have 100% focus. Otherwise, if you're looking at trying to get hurt, that's a good way of doing so. But also, you know, exercising is just something to look forward to every day, you know, if my body allows me to do it, it's awesome. I just love that feeling. Because I can get my diet down pat, my body may reflect that a lot better, all the hard work that I you know, used to do and now trying to maintain everything. But again, it's just something I love. You just tune everything out. Yeah. For me, it's like, you know, that's my our, you know, if I can get through a whole workout, but then, you know, we forget about life for a while or you could take your frustrations out. There's probably his own, you know, with with our illnesses and dealing with, you know, I'll just throw out there right now and health insurance company has an issue, but it's a good way of taking that frustration. It just feels good. It's just something you know, yes, get home. And once you get home, it's hard to one. So

Kelsey Harris:

having a sense of accomplishment, I love this. And it totally makes sense. I also feel accomplished after my workouts. Of course, exercise isn't the only way to obtain a sense of accomplishment. But because there are other evidence based benefits of it for people with chronic pain, let's say, this added benefit is really important. I did ask there, and if it helps with any of his lupus symptoms, mainly think again, pain, here's what he had to say.

Darren Radke:

The answer, I've always believed you need to stay flexible, somehow, some way. And I feel that that helps with, you know, like doing yoga, try to you want to keep yourself flexible. I think it's gonna help, you know, from the muscles standpoint, but as far as knowing some things like that, it's like, do you just kind of hit or miss? You know, when I'm on, you know, walking on my treadmill, and even wearing, you know, knee braces, you can feel a little knock here and there, and I'm liking the way your body's telling you, Hey, you know, you're doing not quite 100%. But a even better, you know, to be easy. Yeah, I mean, I bet they'll go heavy or go home, man fail on it I used to have when I worked out in the gym, definitely had to scale back throughout the years. But I have learned to isolate instead of annihilating muscle, you know, you don't want to tax them too heavy. But when you're working the muscles, you want to make sure like if you're doing bicep, your biceps should be doing all the work, not you know, your back and throwing your back into things. You just want to isolate. So you don't have to go and

Kelsey Harris:

I appreciate Darren's honesty with his answer. It seems that it helps him with certain symptoms, like muscle pain, but not others like joint pain. And he mentioned that flexibility gained from Yoga is important, which I agree with, of course, this is going to be slightly different for every person. So what kind of exercise routine does Darren do? And how does he manage this routine safely?

Darren Radke:

If I have a great day, I would start off the morning. If I remember to do yoga, I don't do anything, you know, beyond you know, balancing things along those lines. But I do have value from prior injuries playing last explores, you know, and all the way through life. But in shortly after that, I'll go on my treadmill, just do some walking, I do have long legs, so I can get up to just about five miles per hour. I know some people are jogging by them. But I don't jog I never liked it would never do get on the treadmill. And after I'm done with that, it holds bad by the afternoon by one, maybe two, depending upon how my body feels I'll do some resistance training. If usually, depending upon which body part I'm working on, I might say it will take 45 to maybe 75 minutes. And usually that's perfect. Today happens to be one of those days where it's like I feel great. I'm going to probably squeeze in another no resistance training. Try to get some of that done today, the previous my body's crop away.

Kelsey Harris:

And what about on days that you're don't feel as great like what do you do any exercise then? Or what do you do on those days?

Darren Radke:

I will do absolutely nothing. I know, my body's telling me, Hey, you got to add a line in there send me but you'd better not cross that line? Are you really gonna pay for it? Call you twice, you know, you take what your body's going to give you. And if it's not there, it's not there. So I've come to you know, your success. You know, I can't do any exercising, which happens quite a bit. I'm fine with me. But that goes, you know, with my overall health, you know, I try to plan these things. But if my body's just not up to it, you know, you just got to accept that, you know, just kind of take it easy.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, I think that kind of answers my next question too, which was like how do you establish a safe routine, but it sounds like you've said focusing on specific muscle groups not exercising when you can't Kind of going not past what you're able to do, is there anything else that you would add?

Darren Radke:

You know, I try to do everything possible to stay safe when I'm doing things. As I mentioned before just walking on the treadmill, I wear knee braces, since I've had my the right knee sculpt back in 2002. And I know my left knee is going 100% as well. So I wear the braces, they do get very uncomfortable. But I also want to preserve them as much as possible being 49 you definitely need to take care of your body. But as well, you know, if I'm doing resistance training, you know, you know how, when you've been doing this for 30 years, you definitely know what you can do what you should do, and what to avoid, and where it's being used in a bold way. You know, you're limited to, you know, the movement. And I learned through experimentation, do what works best, what doesn't. And I've been able to adapt my training style accordingly.

Kelsey Harris:

Darren really listens to his body. And there's a huge difference between listening to our bodies and listening to our minds. If you're listening right now, and you don't exercise your mind might be telling you that you can't. Whereas when Darren is exercising, and his body says stop, he does. Or if he wakes up in his body says No, not today. He takes it as a Not today, but then is back at it once his body says it's okay. Again. He and I can both appreciate that some of you might be having some fear around exercising. I mean, Darren himself has a heart condition and he still does it. So how does he deal with that fear,

Darren Radke:

I do run into with my cardiologist. So we've kind of got to live in agreement to keep myself in a 15 rep to 20 rep range not overtax the heart, because they're in the past, I would get a splitting headache, and never knew why until I talked to a doctor. And before you know, behold, you know, I found out that I had a heart failure. So I need to make sure I don't overdo it. Yeah, I do probably start getting a splitting headache, I better either get to the couch. Or if it starts getting worse. And I haven't had this happen. But I better be calling 911 at a very low possible I have a heart attack or Leadville could blow. So we kind of work together with my cardiologist we know and offer you know, throughout the years, I know when my body is starting to work hard. And my breathing is getting off. And then that tells me right there. And again, that comes from experience throughout the year. And I know it's something that apart. Tell somebody, even those who you know, work out of things along those lines. You know your body even when you're starting to go through a chain during exercise, and you know, it's okay. Otherwise, I'm gonna have more problems.

Kelsey Harris:

So work with your health care team. Make sure you come up with a plan that is safe for your condition. When I started working out again, I actually got a personal trainer who had experience working with clients with autoimmune diseases, and he helps me tailor our program to my current abilities, wants needs and my conditions. He also said don't work out during a flare, which is basically the same advice Darren gave earlier. In Barron's book, he writes about his 10 commandments of exercise. I asked him to share a few of those with us. But for all of them, you're going to have to pick up his book

Darren Radke:

Ten commandments. I borrowed them from a YouTube used to be a power lifter and now big time weightlifter name of CT Fletcher. And if you go on YouTube, he's a great motivator. A lot of swearing. So what he had bodybuilding.com asked him about his 10 command. And I saw this like, wow, that's kind of cool. You know, I thought if I was going to write something about, you know, weightlifting exercises, and why don't I come up with my own points and then the things that I live by? Well, for the most part. I just thought well, what Testing someone that. And this also carries over to my overall health throughout the day, like, you know, like listening to your body all day long. I mean, yeah may seem like a no brainer. But in a way, it's like, there's always got a tendency to always push yourself a little hard, even if it has nothing to do with even working out, you know, there's gonna be things around at home that may need to get done. But, you know, your body's trying to tell you some things, you know, there's always tomorrow, you're not feeling great, you can do more than one record, he ended up doing me a favor for the following day. One of my first commandments is food, and fuel. You know, doing dieting, which are something, again, is my biggest downfall, when you're home all the time, you're planning to go to the cover on the frigerator. Because you're actually bored. you're filling that void with food, which is terrible. But it's tough to avoid when you're home all the time. And that's one thing. And even in Vietnam, the medication that I learned, they said you, you may gain weight, and things like that, you will gain weight, because medication really does a lot of things for the body. But otherwise, yeah, I like when another commandment makes every rep. Again, you know, when your body has reached to a point that maybe you need to quit, or in my situation, you know, I want to make sure that I'm doing things correctly, I'm isolating one other muscle group and I might be working that particular day. I don't like to cheat. So I really want to make that muscle work, make it count. Another one, you know, change your routines often. That is one I actually stole from CT. Because our bodies adapt, adapt to routines adapt to a lot of things in life. It's amazing how our bodies do have a great example and somebody who drinks, you know, regular coffee and then switches to a decaf coffee. You know, by the end of the week, you know they're in knowers near line some stones, you know they don't have any energy, chances are the crabby. Now train I would ever be that way, by the end of the week, your body, you know, got to adapt to something new. And it's like, Whoa, what is what is this guy doing? You know, so you got to change things up, you know, often, you do the same thing over and over again, your body gets used to it. I also talked about how you got to continue to stretch throughout your workout. And that was always something I got some weird worked back in the 90s when I worked out in the gym. Again, I always believed in flexibility, and I didn't want to get hurt. I only got injured once throughout all those years. And from that standpoint, I'm glad that you know, I don't care about the steering or whatever. Like I didn't get hurt. I realize, you know, you got to find what motivates you. And, you know, you got to have fun at what you're doing. Again, you don't want to be exercising by going to the movies and kind of say, oh, you're just working out just to say, you know, hey, I worked out, it's like, well, that's fun. You know, to me, I've always been something I've always enjoyed. Again, that feeling of accomplishment. It was worth it. You know, it's always something you look forward to in your job. You know, making sure you accomplish your goal where even at home to accomplish your goals and being a parent, being a husband. You just want to make sure you're doing everything that you should be doing or could be doing.

Kelsey Harris:

And that brings us full circle back to that sense of accomplishment. Yes, definitely helps if you're having fun doing what you're doing. So sometimes that does require a bit of creativity, especially if you're not someone who enjoys exercising. For example, though That sense of accomplishment may help you eventually enjoy it anyway. And here Darren says that sense of accomplishment and the positive feelings that come with it can be obtained by many other things throughout the day, like getting some tasks done or spending time with your family. And a sense of accomplishment is extremely beneficial for well being. In his book, Darren writes live for today, seize the day. What does that phrase mean to him?

Darren Radke:

You never know what tomorrow may bring. And I know, that's a cliche. But honestly, I was just in a situation where I was in the hospital in early August. And I react from one issue that, you know, I'm going to be going through, you know, the testing process and who knows what, then the brain would I have to make some changes in my life. And that's where, you know, in today's a great example, I feel great. I enjoy this day, everything. When you talk about fees that day, you know, that's where, you know, exercising was one part of it, just trying to get you know, a few things done around the house is another part of it. Feel great. So today, it's like I'm trying to do as much as I can, to make sure I'm not over billing things, because I don't want to put off what I could. Today, the tomorrow because God only knows what tomorrow may bring. I kind of stole that from Dead Poets Society, that movie. But you just when you got chronic illness, or you never know what tomorrow may bring, even things can happen in the same day. You know, if you wait, push things off until Wednesday, in the logs, I'll do this stuff this afternoon. And this afternoon comes and you feel like the youngest by a trauma and drag, you know, a couple blocks down the road. Three years, if the opportunity presents itself, you know, live wise, you know, do something. Don't be stuck like me, you know, where you're holding it like that, enjoy yourself, don't be afraid to have fun. And I also feel like he you know, with our illnesses. You know, we hold ourselves back and it's like, you got a question. And it's like, are we holding ourselves back? Like we're afraid to have fun? You know, because we don't know what else you know. And I often wonder as to myself, it's like the man afraid to have fun. Like forgot what that is.

Kelsey Harris:

Right? Yeah.

Darren Radke:

I feel great. today. Let's go do something you know, with the family. And part of me feels like Oh, boy. I don't know if I should or shouldn't. And it's like God, it's like, I wonder if like, you know, mine just afraid to have fun. even give out throw. Terrible a terrible feeling. It's a head scratcher. Like, why do you want to want to be cooped up in the house? That way on, you know, every day,

Kelsey Harris:

I abandoned the fear of the what ifs around going out and having fun A long time ago. But I appreciate that. For many people. They're stuck there. I'm glad you brought this up. But also how important for our well being it is to go out and have some fun. Okay, so let's talk about Darren's book for a bit.

Darren Radke:

My book chronicles the point on your journey, how things first started and I kind of go through know just how simple that I wake up one morning, my right arm flowing. And five days later, I'm in a hospital class. And I can't I wanted to serve there and go through almost as a timeline, how things change within my life. Not necessarily my health, but also my personal life and how everything. You know, you worked around that and how things kind of derailed your Life to establishment. I talk about a lot of the pros and cons with, you know, my doctors and facilities that I went to a few issues with doctors, big surprise. But also talking about disability. The Disability process is not a walk in the park, it took me three years, lots of paperwork, it is not an enjoyable process in to tell people even you're on disability, you get that funny feeling, you know, because this person believes me. I talk about a lot of my everyday life, how will they affect my family, because it definitely puts more pressure on my wife, I've been told you know, before that, it's like, boy, you must be really strong and be able to talk about the story right now, you should talk to my wife, she's a watch tonight, I ever will be. But also the, you know, towards the end of the brockie, you know, trying to understand what my limitations are, you kind of learn down the hard way. Unfortunately, like an example, the you know, being out in the sun too long, for like two hours was very amenable, you come to find out that it's like, you know, you'd better keep your exposure, you need to have an hour and a half. That way you don't feel the after effects. Because then you know, with lupus, and with all that, you know, you can create your own boundaries. Again, you know, that line in the frame, I know I use that line, way too much. But it's kind of this the way it is, you know, give you know, like don't cross that line. And that's your boundary. It's not a fun thing to have those boundaries, but they're there to keep you safe. It took me three years to write it. Because I'm not a type of person that can just sit down and do everything at once. But my brain doesn't function that way. And there for a while I had posted notes all over my computer. No books or little notes here and there. I mean, I was a disorganized mess. But that was that's the way how I function. You know, the thoughts come and go. And then when the thoughts come, I better write it down.

Kelsey Harris:

So let's do our lightning round questions. All right. So what are the top five songs that describe your life and I'm excited because you're a music lover.

Darren Radke:

I actually had a tough time narrowing it down to five. Not surprising. Yeah, there we go. And the first one is from the bands who are Suicidal. And I would tell people don't get lost in that name. But the song is called Feel Like, and I won't swear, but Crap. Danger group. That's the name of the song. The next song is Through and Through by a band called Life of Agony. Again, I would say don't get locked up in the title of the band. So it is a very serious song into my next one is called Judas by the band Fiv-V. The lead singer actually is Chris Jericho, a famous wrestler, excellent song. Next one some Something's Off by 8 Three kind of a brutal song and Pain and Redefine by Disturbed. I know Disturbed is very well known throughout the industry. It's not a song most people have heard but it's it's a great song. And I think you could call what we go through, you know, looking at redefining things from fire always thought that's an excellent. So that's the five I narrowed it down to I think I had about four.

Kelsey Harris:

Well, I'm very impressed that you were able to narrow it down.

Darren Radke:

Yeah, but these are the five that if I really needed to, you know, they kind of let loose you know of what you're going through what the scribe is dealing with by cafe. You are definitely the one.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah. What's one thing you can't go a day without doing?

Darren Radke:

Can it be a tie?

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, absolutely.

Darren Radke:

Okay, well, my family is number one, but if there's one and a half would have to be a football here in Wisconsin Green Bay Packers. It's, it's a way of life around here. When they play, you plan your whole day around them. And I know I'm not the only one. That's how serious we take them to. So definitely football got to be on that one.

Kelsey Harris:

Awesome. What's one thing you plan on doing in your life that you haven't yet?

Darren Radke:

Take a vacation with my wife. We haven't. You know, of course, with having children, you know, the only vacation we took ourselves was our honeymoon, went down the piano was in the Bahamas, which was perfect. After all the stress we go through, you know, for a wedding. But the only vacation we've been able to take with the children was in thankfully, you know, Walt Disney World. Because throughout the last three years, we have things planned, but we beg to cancel and because of all the changes my wife was going through as a physical therapist, we all know the health industry has its ups and downs, and she definitely was going through a lot of the downs. So we've had some plans that we had to cancel. So right now, it'd be nice to pick a vacation. And we do have one plan for our 25th wedding anniversary. But being in that three years from now, a lack of AFM, but please would like to go back to sandal in the Bahamas and renew our vows with some cool,

Kelsey Harris:

yeah, that's great. I hope that happens for you.

Darren Radke:

Yeah, I do too, yes.

Kelsey Harris:

describe your perfect day.

Darren Radke:

Do whatever I want to do, where you have absolutely no boundaries, you're pain free, you don't have to worry about any issues the following day. To me, that's the perfect day, to be able to do whatever you want to do. Whatever it may be, who cares? You know, that would be perfect, you know, or be able to mix them with family values. Well, you know, I don't have to worry about what tomorrow may bring, I'm gonna feel fun. You know, to me, that would be that would mean everything to me, could describe a perfect day between free and know that there's got to be no consequences for the following day.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, that does sound perfect. How do you inspire others to make the most of their lives?

Darren Radke:

Well, I hope the first one is my book. I hope I can get people to you know, read it, but hopefully that will inspire others to be able to open up maybe have a little more of an understanding what the body is doing. Another one is my actions, you know, how I carry myself how I go about the day. I try not to be somebody who's afraid to do maybe a little more than happy to help out you know, people where I can let those actions carry over. And that might sound kind of cheesy, but I'm going to say it anyway to inspire people and to talk on podcasts such as this one to be able to kind of you know again, hopefully my story inspires others and that people won't be afraid to talk about what they have. Yeah, what do you know everybody's going through everybody's different whatever we can do to pick somebody else up you know to help them out you know one at a time you know

Kelsey Harris:

amazing Where, do you have social media that we could fall follow you on or website we could find

Darren Radke:

my website is www.deceivedfromwithin.com . From there, you can find it you can contact me directly, you can read my blog. I try doing that once a week I did have a little hiccup with dealing with the health insurance issue. But we also can find a location where you can order merchandise APS and lupus fighter merchandise was something that I created where it combines the ribbon both burgundy and purple, which are the separate colors for APS and research. quite proud of that. And you can go to that website and as well as order my book.

Kelsey Harris:

Perfect. Awesome. All right. Well, thank you so much for coming on the show. You've been a fantastic guest.

Darren Radke:

Well, thank you. It's a pleasure to be on your podcast and be able to talk to everybody.

Kelsey Harris:

The theme of this episode really became about how having a sense of accomplishment can improve our well being as chronic illness warriors, even for Darre just have written a book about himself. In addition to that likely being therapeutic, it's obvious that he has a sense of accomplishment with that as well. Earlier I mentioned that I don't think there is use of music and exercise artists struction like he mentioned they were instead it really seems to align with values based living, Health, Exercise, music, these things are important to him, so he participates in activities that are based on his values, and give them some sense of relief, accomplishment and enjoyment. Okay, it's time to reflect. What did you notice about your thoughts and feelings while you're listening to Darren speak today? What do you notice about your noticing either in that moment, or now as reflect back on it? Don't forget to buy Darren's book if you're interested in hearing more from him. And please rate and review the show wherever you get it and let other people know in our amazing community about the show. Thanks everyone for listening this week and keep making the most of it. Special thanks to Nicole Skura for the riginal music and Charity W lliams for the or