Chronically Living and how to make the most of it

How Can I Improve My Gut Health? with Beau Berman

July 26, 2021 Kelsey, Beau Berman Season 2 Episode 5
Chronically Living and how to make the most of it
How Can I Improve My Gut Health? with Beau Berman
Show Notes Transcript

We've heard a lot about gut health the past several years and how it's an important factor in the onset and maintenance of chronic illness. This week I have Beau Berman, the marketing director for Layer Origin, a company that specializes in prebiotic supplements, to share some ways we can potentially improve our gut health.
In this episode we talk about:

  • Why gut health is important
  • Prebiotics vs. Probiotics
  • A type of prebiotic called HMO

Guest Bio:
Beau Berman is a co-founder and marketing director of Layer Origin Nutrition in Ithaca, NY. Berman spent 11 years as an Emmy Award-winning television news anchor and reporter for CBS, FOX, and ABC news affiliates, before pivoting to media relations and marketing in 2019. He holds a Master of Arts in Communications from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He lives in New York with his wife, their two dogs, and three goats.
Check out the Layer Origin website: https://layerorigin.com/
Follow Layer Origin on Instagram: layer_origin

Support the show on Patreon.
Follow me on Instagram: @chronically.living_

Kelsey Harris:

Everywhere I turn to someone, a doctor, a fellow chronic illness warrior, some type of specialist or health coach is talking about gut health.Why is gut health important for people with chronic illness? What does taking a probiotic supplement do for us? What about a prebiotic supplement? How do we know which ones we should take? My guest this week works for a company that makes these supplements and is here to answer the these questions on chronically living.I'm Kelsey Harris, a chronic illness warrior and a psychotherapist and training on chronically living and how to make the most of it, we're providing tangible ways to improve the well being of spoonies. So get ready to make the most out of your life, even with that pesky chronic illness.

Beau Berman:

My name is Beau Berman, and I'm the Marketing Director for Layer Origin Nutrition. We're located in Ithaca, New York, which is a couple minutes from the campus of Cornell University in Central New York, sometimes referred to as upstate New York. And I'm the Marketing Director for the company. And we are a nutrition company originally founded by a team of scientists who met while they were finishing up a postdoctoral fellowship and a PhD at Cornell, who specialize in gut health supplements primarily, but other health supplements as well. And our flagship ingredient is called HMO, which stands for human milk oligosaccharide. So layer origin, nutrition, and the formation of the company began quite a while ago and 2017, whenever two food scientists met at Cornell University, and their names are Jason and Joel. And they, you know, both had a passion for trying to understand, you know, science better, and the science of food and the science of nutrition. And also to help people, they also both were interested in, you know, business as well, you know, if we're being frank, and so they had the idea of let's try to form a company that, you know, produces things that are truly scientifically based and can help people. And that's, of course, the origin story of a lot of nutrition companies you hear about. So that doesn't sound too unique. But in any case, they started, you know, started collaborating, and started putting the wheels in motion, and started filing for patents, you know, and conducted a lot of research themselves and basically formed a little team of researchers in the lab. And they have a lot of expertise. Both of them have PhDs, you know, one of them was a food science professor at the University of Nebraska, and also worked in the private sector at a company that was basically producing the egg whites that are powdered that they put into a lot of protein bars and things of that nature. So a ton of experience and a ton of, you know, knowledge there between the two of them and their team. And that was 2017, basically, three years later of research and development, patents, trademarks, for creating the LLC a lot that goes into starting a business that is pretty crazy. So I joined the team a bit later, they were looking for somebody who could be sort of their expert in marketing and PR and communications, my backgrounds a little bit different. I was a television news reporter for 11 years on CBS, Fox and ABC television stations across the country, and then segwayed into marketing and public relations. And you know, it was able to meet these guys and join the team as a as a co founder and marketing director. So the company has grown a lot in the last year, and we didn't start selling products until very late 2019. So it was two years of really development. And I joined the team in 2020. So not incredibly long ago. But we've grown a lot since then we sell everything on Amazon and on our website, layer origin calm. And so you know, what makes the company different? What makes it notable as again, the flagship ingredient, despite Beau not being one of the scientists himself, he's had to learn a lot about gut health, pre and probiotics and all the science that goes with it in order to do his job, which is why he's here today to talk to us about gut health, starting with Why is it even important? gut health is very important. And I should preface this statement by saying that I am not one of the scientists at our company. So sometimes I'm not the best person to answer that question. However, I do have a communications background. So I've found myself in the role as the person who does interviews for the company, and certainly been briefed by our scientists that said, Yes, gut health is very important. And you know, part of the reason why it's so important is that we've come to know that a lot of the immune system is controlled by or is located in the gut, you know, in the intestines in that microbiome. And of course, there's there's multiple microbiomes something I actually didn't know until a few years ago, but you know, there's essentially a microbiome and the gums there's different micro biomes but the main one, when you hear people say microbiome, of course that they referring to is mostly in your stomach and your gut, the gut and so immune health. Is there and immune health is something that's obviously incredibly important. Beyond that you're talking about this is the center of where the majority of the bacteria is located in the body. And basically, where it's interacting and interfacing with the rest of your systems. I think that increasingly in the last 10, to 15 to 20 years, scientifically, nutritionally, we've come to realize that the gut bacteria, in some sense can actually, in a way control your behavior. In some sense, you know, if you're feeling irritable, and having a craving for sugar, that is often the bacteria in your gut that's craving that sugar. And so it's hard to distinguish, you know, what is you versus what is the bacteria? Are they all the same, I mean, it's your body. So it's kind of one in the same, but it can sort of be independent of your mind, or you know, what you actually want to do, you may say, I'm cutting out sugar for a week, yet, you suddenly have this intense craving that feels like it's almost coming from outside of you, or deep inside of you, and almost out of your control. It's so it's so poignant, are so strong.And so yeah, there's a wealth of research, you know, that I won't get into specific studies. But we've come to realize in recent years, how important the gut is, for so many things, including immunity, weight loss, and even mental health as we look at the connection between the gut in the brain and how they are connected through the vagus nerve, and, you know, things of that nature. So it's incredibly important.

Kelsey Harris:

The Vegas nerve, we just learned about that last week, where my guests mentioned how it does, in fact, interact with their gut. We know that from an autoimmune perspective, the guy is almost always tied into our illness in some way. So of having a basic understanding of how this all works is important for me. And I'm guessing it's probably also important for you to know. So one thing I've always wondered is what's the difference between a prebiotic and probiotic.

Beau Berman:

So a prebiotic is, you know, it's typically a fiber and it's basically going to be feeding probiotic bacteria. And so in one of the videos that we produced for our products, you know, we talked about, you know, it takes, you know, sunlight to, you know, grow grass, and of course, water and some other things as well. And so you have this probiotic bacteria, some of it is natural to the body, some of it you might be getting through external sources, such as a food that delivers probiotic bacteria to the system. But to really nurture that probiotic bacteria, essentially, you know, for lack of a better word likes to eat something. And so the prebiotic fiber, the prebiotic bacteria is going into your system and feeding and nurturing the probiotic bacteria. That's the simplest explanation, the simplest terms. You know, probiotics are living strains of bacteria, we talked about, you bought, you walk into the grocery store, and you see a bottle of probiotics, and it says, X amount of CF use colony forming units on that bottle, or a yogurt. You know, it says like this yogurt is live culture is active and live culture. And so probiotics are typically referring to the live strains of active and good bacteria that exist within your digestive system, within your body prebiotics, and there's a number of different prebiotics, we think ours is the best, which of course, we'll get into, but there's a number and they're actually all good. So none of them are per se bad. But prebiotics are specialized plant fibers or or types of fiber doesn't always have to be plants that act as food for the good bacteria. So that's kind of the simplest explanation. We could probably talk for hours about this. But that's the explanation in a nutshell. Okay, so that's a good explanation of how our gut actually works. But how does taking either a prebiotic or a probiotic impact our gut in a positive way. So you are manipulating your gut health when you you know, externally supplement or when you add, you know, something new to the mix, so to speak. So if you are taking probiotics, you actually have to be careful, because if you take the wrong kind, and it's tough to know what the right or wrong kind is, honestly, which is why we're actually not very to borrow financial term bullish on probiotics, meaning we're not very pro probiotics necessarily supplementation because you have to be very careful with dosage and strain type. And it can be a little confusing to the average person to know which type to take. You know, if you walk into Whole Foods or Trader Joe's or a Wegmans, or lion or Publix grocery store, or whatever health store, there's umpteen options of probiotics and how do you know if you need 100 billion Cfu or 20 billion Cfu or 30 or 50, which strains you need so it can be very complex and confusing. And so what are the risks I mean, we're not talking about something life threatening, but more to The extent of a lot of times people take probiotics when they're having negative gi symptoms or symptoms similar to IBS, you know, what would be characterized as IBS, gas, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, stomach pain, cramping, etc. Poor skin, I mean, it could be a number of things. But if you take the wrong probiotics, or you just kind of guess pick and choose, you could actually exacerbate those symptoms and potentially make them worse, instead of making them better. So that's kind of where we tell people to exercise caution.

Kelsey Harris:

Well, I personally do not like the sound of risking it and potentially making my gut health worse. But you know, let's go back to Beau. For more on this.

Beau Berman:

Coincidentally, as the growth of HMO which is a type of prebiotic, which we'll get into has been really ramping up and interest has been increasing a big part of that actually has been, and we're thankful for this is this author named Joel green. And he wrote a book called The immunity code, which we're big fans of. And in the book, Joel green talks about how he really recommends that you seek the advice of a trained physician, you know, of your choice, you know, whether it's holistic or traditional, or what have you, but somebody who, you know, can really try to do an analysis and gauge what types of probiotics you should take. So I apologize, I've gotten into a bit of a tangent here, about probiotics, but you asked what they're doing to you. And so you know, basically, you're manipulating the colonies, the species, the types of bacteria that are in your gut, and you can change them, you know, you're born with a certain amount, you get some from birth, depending on the way you're delivered as a baby and vaginal delivery, it's believed that you're getting a different amount of different types of bacteria, actually, that is innately given to you that way, then based on what you're eating based on genetics, a host of factors, but you can alter and change that bacteria even in adulthood, for sure. And we know that and but the question is, how do you do it? To what extent you know, how much do you want to do it? And how do you do it. So if you're taking probiotics, you're adding new, you know, species or strains to your gut. And with prebiotics, you're giving them fuel that you feed them essentially. And so they can behave in different ways or grow or mature, expand, etc, I'm probably using the wrong vocabulary there. So you're basically manipulating you're doing a science experiment, or you're trying to feed and help your gut and your gut is like it's a, this is something I didn't really fully understand until recently. But you know, the foods you eat can sort of either be feeding you, or they can be feeding your gut. And that gets like really, you know, kind of meta and little complicated to fully grasp. And it took me a while to kind of process that. But basically, for example, if you eat a baked potato, and you eat it piping hot out of the stove, with butter, or what have you, you know, that's a starchy food that is going to basically be feeding you. So you're going to digest that as a carbohydrate, it's going to be carbohydrate, fuel, simply. But if you let it cool down, there's different properties that exist at that point such that that actually can feed your gut. And so the gut bacteria will digest that. And they'll basically take the benefit. So it basically will just act differently in your body. And the same thing can go for beans, like black beans, or garbanzo beans, the same thing can go for other types of foods as well, the types of food, or the temperature of the food can really matter whether that food is like going to have this, you know, glycemic response in your body spike blood sugar, or affect your gut bacteria, or if it's going to basically just avoid the gut, you know, and kind of go through and process as fiber and then be excreted. So it's very fascinating, you know, I'm not a doctor or a scientist, so I can't speak, you know, to the fine details of it. But it's very fascinating. And there's a lot of research, you know, people can do it individually, to see this process in action. And it gets back to that whole concept of, you know, are you feeding yourself or feeding the gut, but then again, the gut is you. So it's kind of weird to mentally conceptualize.

Kelsey Harris:

So interesting, because I never even considered how the temperature of my food would make a difference in what it does for me. Of course, I'm aware that eating raw versus cooking in different ways makes a difference and what types of food makes a difference? There just happens to be even more to it than that. And when we're talking about our gut, I have a better idea of what prebiotics and probiotics are now. So I think it's time we start talking about HMO.

Beau Berman:

And so that enters the conversation of HMO, which you know, the first time I ever heard that not coming from a science background I thought of actually it was the 90s when I first heard the term HMO, which is like a health management organization it's like a type of health plan you can choose from your employer or something to that extent, but you know, we're hoping that the the new acronym or the new meaning of HMO becomes a lot more familiar to the world and that is human milk oligosaccharide human milk Olga saccharide is a component that is naturally in breast milk in human milk it so HMO is the acronym and it was first discovered around the late 1800s. They began researching it. They started noticing that breastfed babies in general, were having better survivorship or survivability rates, then those who weren't breastfed, or were having less bouts of like diarrhea, things like that, an illness, and so they're okay, why is that? So let's start comparing, you know the difference. And so they looked at, you know, breast milk and what was in it. And there's lactose in it, there's fat. And there's this substance that at the time, they gave a different name, I think they called it gyna, lactose, but ultimately, around the 1950s, then they changed the name to HMO or human milk oligosaccharide. So there's actually a number of oligosaccharides. Some of them basically, if you Google, like best prebiotic supplements, you know, some things will come up, and you'll see there's one called Gao s and there's FOS and xo, S. And so Gao s, for example, stands for galacto, oligosaccharide, FOS is fruto, Olga saccharides. These are different types of chained. I believe they're acids. But so these are, these are types of prebiotics, fibers, essentially. And HMO is one of them. So the story of it is honestly pretty fascinating, at least in my opinion. But, you know, researchers look into breast milk, they're studying it and they're realizing, Okay, wait a minute, this, this specific part of breast milk, this oligosaccharide, that's in it, that's natural to it, are inherent in breast milk is providing the immense benefits, you know, that are coming from breast milk, this is the majority of what is producing the benefits. And so research goes on and on and on. And they're discovering that there's actually about 200 different types of this thing called HMO. And so they get into these really scientific names, they've labeled them like scientists do. And so one of them is called 2'--Fucosolactose , , and one is, you know, 3--2-SL, or LNNT. And so there's 200 of those acronyms and names that are very scientific, but they all have different properties. And so basically, what they're realizing is that Wait a minute, this HMO in the breast milk is basically what is encoding or building the infant gut lining and immune system from scratch, because we know that babies undergo a lot of development during those very formative first few years. And the bulk of their nutrition, especially initially is coming from breast milk for many babies, and some babies, it's formula or other foods, eventually baby food. So they realize that there was this immense benefit. Okay, so that's established, they conducted research studies to the 50s 60s 70s 80s, even the 90s. And it's very much proven that you know, breast milk, because of this specific component is a lot of benefit. The question then becomes that we need to provide this for babies who don't have access to breast milk, either because the mother doesn't want to provide it or can't provide it, because of some, you know, reason. And so they start working on a way to formulate HMO to basically replicate it or synthesize it and create something that's molecularly identical. And that took decades, but they did achieve it scientifically, in the early 2000. I don't know how to say 2010 to 2010 2011, around that era, and then eventually, in 2015, 16, 17, it starts popping up in baby formula. So actually, as you know, listeners can experiment with this, go to your grocery store, or go to the baby formula aisle, whether you have a baby or not. And look at the labels. And you will now see that I think almost in every country, but especially in the US, it says h mo on the label of baby formula, which stands for human milk oligosaccharide. And so there's not actually human breast milk in the baby formula. That's not what they're doing. But what they are doing is they've come up with scientifically there was developed ways that you can create something that is considered to be bio identical to this really powerful formula, or this really powerful component of breast milk. And so how do they do it, there's a number of ways to do it, you can basically take a type of yeast and ferment it and put it through a very complex process. And what you get at the end is bio identical to one type of HMO to a few goes to lactose. Another way to do it, the way we do it is you take lactose, basically cow's milk, you're putting it through an extremely precise fermentation process. And then you're purifying it a number of times. And again, what you arrive at is like basically 98% bio identical. So if you look at it under a microscope, a scientist almost wouldn't even know the difference to the HMO that's in human breast milk. I mean, another way you could get HMO is actually from breast milk, you know, but you know, that's really not scalable for a business or for people and would be really difficult. So, there actually is a company that I guess we'd consider a competitor that is trying to give people HMO through actual human breast milk. And you know, I'm not afraid to say their name. They're called True lakhta and they get it Somehow through milk donors through these donor banks, and, you know, I think it raises a little bit of questions about whether the the people who are providing it know what it's ultimately going towards and whatnot, people are realizing how powerful HMO is. But we've gone a different route. And we're basically creating something that is bio identical to it. And much easier to provide at scale. And it actually is expensive to produce, but it's easier to produce at scale. And so, ultimately, so it's in baby formula, okay. And in 2017 2018. And then the question became, well, wait a minute, can this help adults? And so the race was on to conduct research. And that's where basically the idea of our company came along, because Jason was in the lab and started reading about HMO and thought, Wait a minute, like, why aren't we giving this to adults if it's helping baby so much. And so a lot of these research papers started coming out all over the world. I mean, we're talking many different countries, including the US. And there's a great lab in California and San Diego, run by Dr. Lars Bodie, who has done a lot of the integral research on this, but basically, the answer was yes, HMO, including bio identical HMO was also extremely beneficial for adults beneficial in multiple ways boosting their immunity, literally changing the bacteria in their gut increasing a type of beneficial bacteria called bifidobacteria, increasing a type of beneficial probiotic bacteria called akkermansia, muciniphila. and things of that nature. So then it was okay, well, is it in any products and so initially, you know, there's like this group of people out there who really liked to read scientific papers on PubMed, and different places. And I've realized there's this whole community of people, they don't really have degrees or anything, but they love just becoming like amateur research, meta analysis, folks, and they're good at it. And basically, they started realizing, okay, this is very beneficial. And there's, you know, biohackers out there who really want to figure out, okay, you know, my main traditional doctors not telling me what I can do to fix my IBS, or I don't want to take drugs. So what else can I do? Is there anything that's on the cutting edge, or more natural, and So bottom line is people were realizing that HMOs really good for you. And they were buying baby formula, some adults, a few of them, and, you know, basically like mixing it in with like a protein shake or milk or something and chugging it thinking, Okay, you know, I'm going to get HMO from that. And some people, I mean, this is not a scientific study, but some say that it actually helped them, you know, okay, great. Of course, baby formula is meant for babies and has a lot of fillers in it and other things that you probably don't want. So that's where our company comes in. And we're like, okay, let's take bio identical HMO, and put it in a very pure supplement. So you're not getting all these fillers, and you can boost your immunity, you can help with weight management, which is a bold claim, but it's true. And it's basically a prebiotic that helps to feed the good bacteria in your gut and can actually increase the amounts of it very rapidly. And also in clinical studies, actual clinical trials, which I can send you the links to, after this interview, helped people who, you know, went into the study indicating that they suffered from IBS. And so I've you know, take HMO myself and the the initial differences from it are, were very rapid for me, of course, you know, that's not a scientific study, that's just one person, but anecdotally, really helped me I'm not someone who suffered from IBS. But, you know, I believe that all of us occasionally have issues with gas or things that we'd rather not talk about. And for me, it was really beneficial in that realm. And from a health standpoint, in general, I did feel much better when I started taking it. So that is HMO and we're really excited about it. We think that it's kind of the next big thing.

Kelsey Harris:

What I took away from that history of the development of HMOs is that it like other prebiotics are good for gut health, and seems to be able to help with some IBS symptoms. Because there is such overlap with IBS and many autoimmune and other chronic illness conditions, there's a chance that prebuilt biotics like ones with HMO can be helpful for us

Beau Berman:

to get the feedback that we've gotten, which are emails from people and reviews, which we wish people would leave on more reviews, but unfortunately, including myself, it's like I buy a product and I kind of just move on with my life and forget to ever go back and tell them how I liked it. But anyway, the reviews we do get five or 99% of them are really positive. And you know, people who are making like, honestly, really bold claims, we're like, wow, that's that's amazing. We didn't even think it would help with that. But people are saying that it helped them get over lactose intolerance. People are saying that's helped them be able to consume, you know, milk for the first time in years. People are saying that it's helped them, you know, help their stomach troubles completely. And so, I mean, look, the results vary. I mean, my father started taking it and he said, I don't notice any difference. And I said, Yeah, I mean, that's okay. You know, I had an aunt that took it and she said it made things worse. So, you know, you honestly never know and that's kind of the warning I said at the beginning was that especially with probiotics because she took the product we have that's a mixture of probiotics and prebiotics. It's HMO plus probiotics, and he has to be careful with probiotics, pre buy Eggs are less like that for the most part, but but they can't do you. So you have to be careful with dosage and things like that otherwise you can exacerbate sometimes symptoms that you already have. And so that's always a risk you're taking, right? Because you're you're basically, you know, adding things to the culture in here and hoping that you're putting in the right amount. But we are pretty careful with the dosing the labeling of recommended dosage. And we encourage people to start off small and work their way up, like you normally see on supplement labels. And if you do it that way, it's generally extremely safe. But yeah, the results have just been incredible. And, you know, it's just so weird to see someone in like Australia, write a review on your website and say, thank you so much, this has changed my life. And you're just like blown away, because you think that it's going to help them to some extent, but to see some people with these really drastic results is amazing.

Kelsey Harris:

Okay, like I said, It all sounds really helpful. But those of us with chronic illnesses are always going to be careful, as we should be about adding in supplements or making other changes to our bodies. Because the last thing we want is to make things worse, here's what Beau had to say about that,

Beau Berman:

we still suggest that everybody talk to a doctor, you know, before starting anything, any new supplement regimen, because you just you know, want to run it by them. And again, whether that's your traditional physician, or if you go to a functional medicine physician, or integrative or holistic, or naturopathic, and we actually get a lot of orders. Now, the wholesale orders in large quantities from doctors, which has also been a lot of validation for us because we feel like okay, if doctors are ordering large quantities of this and then providing it to their patients or you know, making it available, then that's kind of a good sign a good litmus test for us. But to get back to your question for people dealing with chronic illness, I think they should try it. You know, personally, of course, I'm biased, I'm with the company, but we have competitors. And you know, I mean, there's other companies now that are jumping into the market who also provide bio identical HMO supplements. And so ours come in a capsule format or a powder. And those were the initial staples that we provided. And then we just launched seven new products as well. So some of them combined HMO with vitamin d3, and zinc. Some of them, you know, are combined HMO with fiber, very diverse types of fiber. And some of them combined HMO with something called colostrum, you know, which some I'm sure some of your listeners have heard of, which is basically the pre milk of cows, which is supposed to be extremely beneficial. And so we're spinning up a lot of varieties. And you know, people can tailor it to their needs, basically pick the product that they think fits their needs the best. Our most popular product is pure HMO, prebiotic powder, which is just a very, very pure HMO powder, it's almost like buying the baby formula. But without all the fillers, it just has HMO, that's it. And you take a scoop or two a day, and you know, people see incredible results from that usually within like two or three days, which I find it's almost too good to be true. But for me, those results tapered a little bit, you know, it was like I saw this very immediate impact, and then it tapered a little bit. And so for me, my personal body preference was to cycle on and off of it, take it for three weeks, stop for a week, take it for another, you know, that sort of thing. So people with chronic illness, I mean, I think after consulting with a physician of some sort, it's something I would try. I mean, you know, I'm in a few different groups, really for research and just understanding the needs that people have. And when I say groups, I mean, on Facebook, you know, there's a lot of groups of, you know, what can I do to cure IBS? or What can I do to heal my gut health and even from the immunity standpoint, I mean, it's something that's why I like to take HMO primarily is just to bolster the immune system. And because honestly, if you look at the research studies, and this is what I love about our product, if you just Google human milk oligosaccharides, or human milk, oligosaccharide research study, or go to PubMed and just type in a GMO, it just comes up I mean, you can you can read the studies yourself, and it can be sometimes tough to digest them if you're not a scientist or have the science background. But just in plain English, you can see the results and you know, how much HMO helps infants and then more recently, the last two to three years, the adult studies, and the research is there and the clinical studies. So it's it's really a matter of just, you know, are you willing to give it a shot? And I mean, people have referenced like, Is there a yuck factor of I mean, the titles a little weird, obviously, human milk, August saccharide. But again, our product doesn't even have any human milk in it, which is always, you know, makes it a little bit tough to market because it's kind of confusing, you know, it's called human milk oligosaccharides. It doesn't have milk in it, but it's based on human milk and the components of it. You know, taking prebiotic fiber is not something that in general should cause harm, you know, it should probably only be able to help

Kelsey Harris:

to summarize, consult your doctor and then maybe give it a try, because we're always looking for ways to improve our well being and this might just be one of them. The philosophy of layer origin is about the layers of well being to find out what those layers are head to Patreon, as its exclusive content for patrons of chronically living. So one thing I like to do with all my guests is just ask some lightning round questions. What are the top five songs that describe your life?

Beau Berman:

Yeah, so that's tough to answer especially come up with five of them. But this is going to date me a little bit and kind of tip off the era that I grew up in. But I would say you know, one of them is I mean, these are mostly just songs that I like but I would say the song semi charmed life by the band Third Eye Blind is one that I really like and I always like the title of it as well. You know, it's like you haven't you know, a charmed life is it makes me think of like the movie it's a wonderful life, you know, and he realizes he has a charmed life with at the end with his family and everything and you know, I like to think of you know, life is like I have a semi charmed life I think that's what that means. You know, that it's it's pretty it's pretty good, you know, has its ups and downs, but it's not perfect but but it's it's there is some charges to turn to life to some extent. There's a song called You know, this is very esoteric, but there's a song called post humorous by a new artist, newer artists called Gus, dapper chin who's like 22 years old or something. And I just started loving this artist, like so much I've been to every song he makes, and I'm going to see him in concert in Canada in November. So post humorous by gust abberton is a song about loss actually in grief in a way. And my mother passed away in 2015. So it kind of reminds me of that in a good way of just getting over that and living with grief. But you know, trying to also have humor in your life and be positive. And then wrapping up Mr. Jones, by Counting Crows is one of my favorite songs. He mentioned Spain, he mentioned gray, which is my favorite color. It's kind of sad color, but it's my favorite color. And then there's a song called something good by the band called alt j. that I really like. And and then finally, another song called something good can work by a band called two door cinema club.

Kelsey Harris:

I noticed a theme and a lot of those songs. Yeah, what's one thing you can't go a day without doing?

Beau Berman:

Boring answer. But I would say drinking water, I always tell my friends to do this too. I'm a huge fan of like ultra purified water. So we had this system put into our house that was like $5,000 to you know, make sure your water is very, very, very pure. And I don't know, I'm a little bit paranoid about water quality. I used to live in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and we had major problems with lead in the public drinking water. And the other thing to worry about, and I hate to be a worrywart, but you know, there's a chemical called PFA s, which, you know, as the American water system that comes from like, you know, basically firefighters and some of the chemicals, they were using foam and stuff, and it's gotten into the water sources. And so I drink water every day, you know, most of us do, most of us should. And so like the first thing I do when I wake up is try to do like eight ounces, which is a small amount of just really cold, pure water, and then move on from there with some coffee or something else. But I don't know that's a super boring answer. But I would say drinking water, an answer that makes me sound like a jerk and like, elitist or something as I also like to check, you know, financial stuff every day. So whether it's like the stock market, or cryptocurrency I like to check it out every day. It's like a bad habit, but just looking at the prices and stuff. So those are probably bad answers. But

Kelsey Harris:

well, the water one was a very healthy answer. We'll give you that. What's one thing you plan on doing in your life that you haven't yet,

Beau Berman:

I guess a humble brag here, but I plan on going to the Galapagos Islands, a very interesting place, you know, Darwin and so much history there and of natural biology and things of that nature. And so I'd love to do that. And the humblebrag is that I'm going to get to do it in August. So I'm going to be going there for a trip for nine days or something to that extent. So I'm very excited about that. And hopefully the trip actually happens with you know, all the COVID protocols and everything, which are obviously very important. But yeah, so that's something that you know, kind of a cheat answer, because it's something I'm about to do, but I haven't done it yet. And something I do plan to do, as long as everything goes off. Okay.

Kelsey Harris:

Cool, actually, like I love traveling. So like that's actually on my list at some point too. So cool. Describe your perfect day.

Beau Berman:

Perfect Day would be a Friday, it's my favorite day of the week. I love the anticipatory factor of the entire weekend is still ahead of you, for the most part. So it's like, you know, Friday, possibly like 3pm you know, so a lot of Fridays left as well. No work, no responsibilities, really, it's sunny outside 76 degrees, a little bit breezy, but not too windy. And then this this day would include friends, and a lot of laughter, really good food, and then also a fitness activity so that I don't feel too gluttonous and you know, weighed down by all the food I had. So you know, playing some sort of sport or hiking or running or swimming, but and probably a body of water as well, you know, whether it's a lake or an ocean. And that's it.

Kelsey Harris:

Very nice. And how do you and your company inspire your clients to make the most of their lives?

Beau Berman:

I think we inspire our clients to make the most of their lives through positive results. Frankly, you know, I think, you know, there's a lot of companies that have a really good marketing pitch, and sometimes you buy the product because they make you feel really excited. You're like, I'm going to try this and I'm going to start exercising more and everything's gonna change which is fine. That's good. You know, motivation is a really good thing and powerful thing. But then you take it and you're like, well, this isn't really doing anything, okay. Or, you know, in the past, I've taken probiotics and I know Notice zero difference, which doesn't mean it's not helping, of course. So I think, you know, through positive results, we inspire people I hope and to make change and positive changes in their lives. And we, you know, try to be ethical and everything we do and moral and you know, we've had situations where people want to return the product, and we accept all returns and don't ask questions, we try to be pretty honest and blunt about, you know, this works for a lot of people, it doesn't work for everybody. So we don't guarantee that the product works, we do guarantee that we'll accept your return, though, if you don't like it. And I think we're coming from a place of science and not just, you know, guessing or hoping that something works, but it's researched and the fact that it's built on clinical trials. And we're lucky in the sense that we didn't particularly pay for our HMO clinical trials, because they existed already, for adults, because this is an area of research that's really growing. And there's a lot of excitement. And so, you know, a lot of universities are testing this at this point. And actually, there's a lot more research coming online. So it should lift the tides of the HMO sort of movement, we view it kind of like probiotics were about 15, 20 years ago, where you would kind of hear about them. And it's hard to like to even think about that now. But let's think of like 2002 or 2004, and you would certainly hear about probiotics, but kind of didn't know what they were or what they were for how you're supposed to use them or even where to get them. And you know, people didn't really understand the role that gut played in your overall health at all. And so we think HMOs, kind of at that phase right now, it's really young, and it's not quite mature yet as in the market, but we think it's gonna have a rapid advancement and hopefully really help people's lives because it provides a lot of actual tangible benefits, you know, and we're excited about that, because we think that basically can benefit every single person out there. People with certain illnesses and people who don't have an illness can also benefit from it.

Kelsey Harris:

Amazing. And where can we find your products? You mentioned Amazon and your website.

Beau Berman:

Yes, so if you go on Amazon and just search layer origin nutrition, LAYER ORIGIN NUTRITION or pure HMO is a good way to search for it just PUREHMO is our kind of our brand of HMO our line. So if you're like an Amazon Prime member, a lot of people like to do that you get that two day shipping and it's really easy you click one button and you get it you know, in a couple days, or if you want to support our company, we also get higher margins if you buy it from our website. So we don't line the pockets of Amazon we're able to just produce buy more inventory and better spread the word about our products. So layerorigin.com is our website, but either way is great. And you know, we appreciate any support and hope to really spread the word about HMO. So yeah, layerorigin.com is the best place.

Kelsey Harris:

Awesome. Thanks so much for coming on Beau. This has been really informative.

Beau Berman:

Yeah, thanks so much for having us. And you know, we're happy to have been able to talk about this topic and and share some of the knowledge.

Kelsey Harris:

We know gut health is important and taking supplements can be very helpful for us prebiotics, and specifically HMO is one way we can do that. I'm actually interested in trying a prebiotic versus a probiotic based on what I've learned today. That being said, if you're thinking the same thing, make sure that you touch base with your doctor first and see what they say. As always, let's do a little bit of a self reflection. What did you notice about your thoughts and feelings during this episode, I noticed that I might have a way to have fewer IBS symptoms. What are you noticing now about you're noticing? Don't forget you can support the show by heading over to Patreon. I also love reviews so I can know what content to bring you. You can take myself and layer origin on Instagram with your takeaways from this episode. Our handles are in the show notes. Until next week, keep making the most of it everyone. Special thanks to Nicole sicura for the original music and attorney Williams.