Chronically Living and how to make the most of it

Are You Feeling Invisible? with Sarah Luby

June 28, 2021 Kelsey, Sarah Luby Season 2 Episode 1
Chronically Living and how to make the most of it
Are You Feeling Invisible? with Sarah Luby
Chapters
Chronically Living and how to make the most of it
Are You Feeling Invisible? with Sarah Luby
Jun 28, 2021 Season 2 Episode 1
Kelsey, Sarah Luby

Season 2 kicks off with my guest, performing artist, Sarah Luby, and our discussion about what it's like to have an invisible illness. Sarah has not one, but two invisible illnesses and yet that is not stopping her from living her dream, instead it inspired her to help others through the power of song. 
In this episode we discuss:

  • what it's like to have an invisible illness
  • why Sarah decided to advocate for the community through song
  • what Sarah has found to be most helpful in dealing with her illnesses on a daily basis
  • how Sarah looks to the future

Guest Bio:
An award-winning vocalist, Sarah Luby is known for her work in both theatre and film. She is a graduate of the Desautels Faculty of Music with a BMus in Vocal Performance. In May of 2021, Sarah completed RMTC’s Inaugural National Mentorship with David Connolly (Associate Artistic Director of Drayton Entertainment) with a focus on Disability Representation in the Arts. Sarah has appeared on stages such as RB Stage, WSO, MB Opera, and can be seen as Tracy Bennet on Lifetime’s “Let’s Meet Again on Christmas Eve” and Natalie Cross on CBC’s “Burden of Truth”. Sarah is an Ambassador for the Invisible Disabilities Association, bringing awareness, education and visibility to Invisible Disabilities. You can hear her debut single “INVISIBLE”, out now!
Follow Sarah on Instagram @sarah_luby14
Check out her website: www.sarahvluby.com
And don't forget to download Invisible.

Follow the show on Instagram @chronically.living_
Support the show on Patreon. Spoonie and Warrior Tier members will get an extended version of the song Invisible to listen to as well as additional commentary on the episode.

Sign up for the exclusive Instacart offer by following this link.

Original music by Nicole Skura.
Original artwork by Charity Williams.

Show Notes Transcript

Season 2 kicks off with my guest, performing artist, Sarah Luby, and our discussion about what it's like to have an invisible illness. Sarah has not one, but two invisible illnesses and yet that is not stopping her from living her dream, instead it inspired her to help others through the power of song. 
In this episode we discuss:

  • what it's like to have an invisible illness
  • why Sarah decided to advocate for the community through song
  • what Sarah has found to be most helpful in dealing with her illnesses on a daily basis
  • how Sarah looks to the future

Guest Bio:
An award-winning vocalist, Sarah Luby is known for her work in both theatre and film. She is a graduate of the Desautels Faculty of Music with a BMus in Vocal Performance. In May of 2021, Sarah completed RMTC’s Inaugural National Mentorship with David Connolly (Associate Artistic Director of Drayton Entertainment) with a focus on Disability Representation in the Arts. Sarah has appeared on stages such as RB Stage, WSO, MB Opera, and can be seen as Tracy Bennet on Lifetime’s “Let’s Meet Again on Christmas Eve” and Natalie Cross on CBC’s “Burden of Truth”. Sarah is an Ambassador for the Invisible Disabilities Association, bringing awareness, education and visibility to Invisible Disabilities. You can hear her debut single “INVISIBLE”, out now!
Follow Sarah on Instagram @sarah_luby14
Check out her website: www.sarahvluby.com
And don't forget to download Invisible.

Follow the show on Instagram @chronically.living_
Support the show on Patreon. Spoonie and Warrior Tier members will get an extended version of the song Invisible to listen to as well as additional commentary on the episode.

Sign up for the exclusive Instacart offer by following this link.

Original music by Nicole Skura.
Original artwork by Charity Williams.

Kelsey Harris:

Have you been feeling invisible lately, trying to deal with your illness but feeling alone like no one understands and no one ever will. Maybe you had all these goals for your life you wanted to accomplish, but now you're sick or in chronic pain and you feel like you can't. My guests this week, Sara Luby shares her journey with Type One Diabetes and undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and how she's dealt with these very issues. Welcome to season two of chronically living. I'm Kelsey Harris, a chronic illness warrior and a psychotherapist and training on chronically living and how to make the most of it, we're providing tangible ways to improve the well being of spoonies. So get ready to make the most out of your life even with that pesky chronic illness.

Sarah Luby:

My name is Sarah Luby. I'm from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. I am a performer in Film Television Theatre. And I'm also somebody who identifies with invisible disabilities. So I've had Type One Diabetes since I was age 11. And undifferentiated connective tissue disease since I was 17. And I recently became an ambassador for the invisible disabilities association to hopefully raise awareness and education on the topic.

Kelsey Harris:

Sarah and I never met before this podcast recording, we just had a quick chat online, but we're actually connected through our dads. It's interesting because we were both from Winnipeg, and we both have differentiated connective tissue disease. I know it's crazy. Yeah. Yeah. Well, and then we were just talking before we hit record that like our dads golf together, and that's how we connected.

Sarah Luby:

I know, I know. It's crazy. You know, I don't actually know many people with undifferentiated connective tissue disease. So this is kind of cool for me.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah. You know, it seemed here, I interviewed one person with uctv, as well, who's from Toronto, but she was the only the person that really like I connected with in this way. So it's interesting.

Sarah Luby:

Yeah, it's also such a mouthful to say. And, yeah, I was just thankful it came out this time.

Kelsey Harris:

I know. Like, do you find your stutter over it, too?

Sarah Luby:

Absolutely. Yeah. I was like, I didn't realize there was an acronym or shortened version for it, which I will now be using in the future.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, makes it way easier, but then people are like, what's that?

Sarah Luby:

You're like, Oh, okay. I gotta explain it now.

Kelsey Harris:

So Sarah has not one but two autoimmune diseases. And like everyone else with a chronic illness, she has been on quite a journey.

Sarah Luby:

It's an adventure. I guess we'll start with the diabetes. I was diagnosed at age 11. We were in Minneapolis on a family vacation. And my mom had gotten bitten by a tick the day before. And we thought it was a cancer small, to be honest. It's kind of a gross story. So I had been, like touching it and making sure that it was okay. And we'd like bought plastic baggies from target for when it fell off. And we were like, this isn't getting bigger. Why is this more getting so much bigger? So we we found a walk in and it was a tick that was that was a bit traumatizing that I'd been playing with it for 24 hours. But then the next day, like, I had been in the hospital, in and out earlier that year, but they couldn't, they couldn't find anything wrong with me. I even went through a point where I was in a wheelchair, and walk. But yeah, things got better, I suppose. I don't think we noticed the signs or knew the signs and symptoms of having type one diabetes. But we were at the Minneapolis zoo, and I was playing in the waterpark and my parents looked at me. And they started to cry, because apparently I looked like a skeleton of myself. And obviously, I didn't notice that. But I had been like ferociously drinking so much fluids and going to the washroom all the time, right, which are all symptoms that we just didn't know. But my mom was like we need we need to go to the doctor. So we knew where the walking clinic was because of her tick button when I got there to check my blood sugar. It was at 54 in Canadian, which is like 950 something American. And they rushed me to the hospital. And I mean, it's kind of a blur after that. I believe I slept for 18 hours, but I should have been in diabetic ketoacidosis at that point, which can also put you in a deadly coma, which somehow I wasn't Thank God. Yeah, I spent the next two days there, which you can imagine is an expensive, expensive bill as well. And then you know, my life changed from there on me know there's so many amazing people also who live with this illness every day. So it's not to say that you can't do anything you want. do with it. It's just it's learning how to live your life and not let it control you. Until obviously, I grew up really fast because of that, I would say I missed some things in my childhood. But you know, I matured quickly because of that. And I think I got my drive to succeed in life from having that illness. And then when I was 17, I thought I broke my finger, somehow didn't do anything to break the finger, but I'm very clumsy. So I was just like, Yeah, you did something, because it was so swollen. And so I went to the doctor, and they sent me to a rheumatologist. And that's when I got a diagnosis with the inflammatory markers, obviously, and all that stuff. And, you know, after that I was diagnosed with other autoimmune and chronic illnesses that kind of fit into that undifferentiated connective tissue disease box. And that's the long monologue of how I was diagnosed.

Kelsey Harris:

So I'm curious what symptoms you have

Sarah Luby:

a lot of inflammation and swelling all the time, it definitely started out in my hands. They were like ballooned up. Also in my feet, I remember my face, I got my grade 12 yearbook picture taken, and it came back and I started crying because I, I was like a balloon, I was a circle. And I didn't know why at that time. And, you know, I thought I was a very healthy teenager who eat well and exercise regularly. And those were some of the main symptoms. And then I also have Raynaud's, I don't know how you actually, I've heard it a bunch of different times. Nobody knows how to pronounce it. I always kind of like ran it. I just like drift off at the end of the sentence. I have another thing called and I, every time I talk to the doctors, I still can't say it. It's something like arithme, loralja, it's a really hard word. And I just have given up on trying to learn how to say it. But basically, it feels like my hands and my feet and different parts of my body are on fire, because all the blood is rushing to them. So those were kind of like secondary things that were happening during my diagnosis. And I would have like, really bad heart palpitations. And like I was having a heart attack in my face would turn bright red. And you know, at the time, you're like, what, what is going on with me? Right? They were all connected, but those that's kind of my experience with it. And now I'm on my myriad of medications, but there's obviously still pain every day. I don't know about you. It doesn't go away for me.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, same I have pain every day. That's like pain is my main symptom. UCTD is so interesting, because everyone's experiences with it are so different. Sara symptoms seem to be more severe than mine and mine were more severe than last season's guests and yell. And then of course, there are all the reasons not to Google your symptoms before or after diagnosis. For me, this is always an important lesson. But if you're anything like me, then I feel like it's one we just learned over and over because I have many times googled symptoms after I've taught myself not to.

Sarah Luby:

He told me I was sitting between lupus and rheumatoid. I remember, because I was 17. I googled lupus. And I just I lost it. Because obviously, you read all the worst possible outcomes. Right? And I yeah, yeah, I think one of the big things is, for the longest time, I couldn't tell which symptom was which, whether it was coming from my diabetes, or whether it was coming from my undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Because with diabetes, you very much have to rely on what your body's feeling. And my body was feeling so many different things that it got to the point where I just couldn't tell what it was and that was causing me a certain amount of anxiety.

Kelsey Harris:

Right. after this short break, we'll be back to talk about something that might resonate with many of you the experience of having an invisible illness. Hey, warriors, what if it was possible to get local fresh groceries delivered right to your front door, you could take a deep sea yoga with all that free time. Well instacart gives you unlimited grocery delivery for one low monthly fee. This is definitely better than paying for delivery on all those other apps. Forget that one ingredient you needed to make that super healthy smoothie. instacart can deliver to your front door in as little as an hour. You can shop multiple stores getting all your favorites on a single order. Instagram even highlights deals so that you can save money. Get all the products you love hand selected by shoppers based on your preferences. They'll pick the freshest produce handle, keep your eggs safe to find everything you usually buy and get smart suggestions on new items to get free delivery on your first order. For over $35, follow the link in the show notes to let instacart know that we sent you, and help to help support the show. With instacart, you'll never step foot in the grocery store again. One of the big topics that Sarah and I discussed was what it means and what it's like to have an invisible illness. There are so many people who identify this way, and very likely many of you listening do this is what Sarah had to say.

Sarah Luby:

Yeah, I think it's such a broad term. Yeah. I like I've been reading about it and trying to research and there's so many different definitions. But to me, it's like it's having a disability that is hidden in plain sight, right. And I think something to acknowledge is just because you can't see it doesn't mean that it's not there. And it doesn't mean that it's any less difficult than having a physical disability. Right. And in my research, I've been trying to understand what other people with invisible disabilities feel like, and I've read a lot about receiving comments, well, you don't look sick, right? What do you think is one of the worst things that you can say to somebody with an invisible disability, right? Or, you know, even when somebody comes up to you and tries to explain your invisible disability, or what you should be doing differently to get rid of it?

Kelsey Harris:

Right?

Sarah Luby:

Well, that's, it's not going anywhere. But But thank you for that. Yeah, I think there's just there's not enough education about invisible disabilities out there. And I've certainly in the past, you know, I present is very healthy. So I think people don't think my struggles are as difficult. And it's certainly something that I have hidden as well, because I never want to feel like a burden. Or for people to see me differently. I like to say like, I'm Sarah, who happens to have these illnesses versus the sick girl who happens to be named Sarah, you know, you don't want to be your illness.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, totally. I've kind of feel the same way. Like, yeah, like I happen to have this illness. And it's just like, it's a part of my experience, but it's not who I am. And I think that just kind of being able to differentiate that is helpful. This, this is so important. We can talk about identity first versus person first language. But I really think that how we identified drastically impacts our experiences with our illness, being able to externalize the illness as a separate entity can actually lead to improved mental health and greater self efficacy, which is integral in being able to manage and live with chronic illness. Have you had experiences where you've been cleared or you know, just like, maybe put out or just fell off because of having an invisible illness?

Sarah Luby:

Mm hmm. I don't think gaslit when I have told people about my invisible disabilities, I think I've chosen carefully who I tell. And they've always been very, very accepting. But it also is to a point you don't truly understand it, unless you're living with it, right? If I felt misunderstood by anyone, it's been doctors, to be honest. You know, I remember speaking up to one of my doctors once where they were just like, well, I just I don't know what to say. And I was like, I'm living with this. Every day right or pet endocrinologists in the past two, were trying to give you this advice that they bred out of a textbook over and over, and I'm like, every person with diabetes has a different experience. Like even this might be too much information. But when a woman has their period, it affects their blood sugar completely. So you have to take into consideration those things. And I think, unless you have that lived experience, you will never fully understand how to speak to someone with that disability. And that's something I've struggled with when they make you feel bad. They make you feel guilty for just trying to stay alive.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, I had really, I had a really stressful event in my life. It was a breakup and, and I had like severe pain to the point where my boss at work sent me in an ambulance to the hospital. And when I got there, it was a resident who was helping me and he was basically accusing me of wanting pain medication. And I'm like, I don't use drugs, have my whatever pain medications. My rheumatologist at this hospital gave me like, help me.

Sarah Luby:

Yeah, I think that's a common thing. They don't believe you.

Kelsey Harris:

Mm hmm.

Sarah Luby:

Like, why would I be lying about this? I don't want to be at the hospital right now.

Kelsey Harris:

Like I get it. There was someone else in the ER, there's an older man if he was screaming about how much pain he is in and he's probably a regular there, you know, and I get that that does happen. That doesn't mean it's everybody.

Sarah Luby:

Oh, I definitely , I felt that before I was diagnosed, no one, no one believed me. So it's a seeing isn't always believing.

Kelsey Harris:

as Sarah mentioned, she's a multi talented performing artist. And she actually just released a song about having an invisible illness called invisible.

Sarah Luby:

Yeah, I was just part of the Royal Manitoba theatre Center's inaugural national mentorship. And you know, when I applied for it, it is for marginalized communities. And I almost didn't send in an application because I was like, I'm not Margiela marginalized enough, which sounds absolutely awful. But I was like, do I actually deserve to be a part of this? And obviously, it came to the conclusion that Yes, I do. And that I thought I could help people through my art to an underrepresented community. So I asked to be paired with the wonderful David Connolly, who is the Associate artistic director of Drayton entertainment, a huge Theatre Company in Ontario. And he also happens to be a double amputee, which is incredible. He's also the only amputee to ever perform on Broadway, which is crazy. And we were, we were chatting about it. And he told me that he hit it. At that point, I don't know how he did it, he hit it, on Broadway dancing, he, he went to a musical theater program, and, you know, managed to conceal it. And he said, when he did outwardly speak about it, and trying to think when that was, I'd say, like, late 80s, early 90s, don't quote me on that, that could be like completely not the correct thing. But that there were repercussions, which is devastating. So we had a lot of those conversations. And, you know, I kept telling him that I want to somehow through the arcs speak about invisible disabilities, and he was like, to make the greatest impact, use your greatest strength. And my greatest strength is my voice and my performing abilities. So I think at that point, I still wasn't quite sure how I was going to do that. But we just started chatting about writing a song. And then I said, Hey, I know someone who I think would be the right person to do this with we, we've worked together on different shows before Duncan Cox. And I pitched it to him. And he was like, Yeah, let's do this. And I remember a question he asked early on was, like, Am I the right person to do this with because I don't have invisible disabilities? And I think that's like, a question that's going on a lot in the arts right now is, if I have if I don't have these lived experiences, should I be telling this story? And like, it's a completely valid question, right? And I was like, you know, if it was just you writing this song, then no, I don't, you shouldn't be doing that. But I said, we're doing it together. Half of this team has lived experiences, right. And I think you bring such incredible abilities to the table to help tell this story. I also said, you know, you could have invisible disabilities and not be aware of it, because it's such, such a broad term covers mental illness, mental health, it covers brain injuries, arthritis, diabetes, like the list goes on, and on and on. Right. And I was like, please don't feel that you have to share if you have any of those with me. But, you know, I think I think this is something bigger than the two of us. So we worked on that for a few months together. And I mean, it was not an easy experience for me, because I had to open up so much more information than I normally disclosed people in order to, you know, have the song reach the impact that we wanted it to and feel completely vulnerable. But he was wonderful about that. He obviously knew this was sensitive information and topics for me. And yeah, then I contacted a friend they have for creating this video, I had this idea that I wanted most of it to be in black and white. And then when I step onto the stage, it's color, because that's the time that I truly feel like my pain goes away. I don't know what that that feeling is for you. But I know in the past, I've had pain, or even injuries, and I step on stage and I managed to forget it for like, the five minutes that the song is right. So that's what I was really trying to convey in that piece. And I think the response to it has been really wonderful. And, you know, I just want people to know that they're not alone.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, yeah, that's awesome.

Sarah Luby:

You can you can push through it in the best possible way.

Kelsey Harris:

Mm hmm. What Sarah seems to be saying is that when she does what she loves, she gets into that zone. She's mindful and fully present with what she's doing. And rather than stop her from living her passion, her passion helps take away some of the burden having chronic illnesses has given her I can definitely say that. I've been in some More positions, when I'm so mindful of what I'm doing, I can be aware of what else is there without letting it take away from my current experience. Before we continue, I think we should check out a 32nd clip of the song invisible. Absolutely beautiful. I want everyone to leave the show kind of with something that they can use in their everyday life to improve themselves kind of the the goal of the show. So I'm just wondering if there's one thing that you have done or do kind of regularly that helps you improve your life.

Sarah Luby:

I mean, for me, it's exercise. To be honest, I have a lot of pain, if I just sit still and obviously working day to day that can be difficult. So I try and exercise quite a bit throughout the week. You know, also speaking about your, your disabilities or your illnesses, obviously, you have to feel comfortable doing that, or you have to, you know that you're speaking to someone that you feel you can trust. But I think that does help when you, you don't feel alone, you don't feel that you're hiding. So I would say if you do feel comfortable, or you do have someone that you know can be that confident to you absolutely share that with him, because I think it will make your life better.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah. Sounds like you have some of those people in your life.

Sarah Luby:

I do. I have a wonderful support team. And then I'm wondering for exercise, is there anything specific that you do?

Unknown:

Oh, you know, it's been strange with the lockdown. It's a lot of workouts at home, I've always found dance to be very good for my body, like I was a competitive dancer growing up. So I find that really loosens up my body. I do run quite a bit. One say that that helps in terms of pain, but it makes me feel good still, like just moving my body makes me a happier person. And stretching. Stretching to me is huge. I would say Actually, that's the biggest having flexibility for me is kind of saved. Saved My Life.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah, you know what? Honestly, I have really been into stretching the last six months or so. And it's the best thing ever, isn't it?

Sarah Luby:

Isn't it? Even like when you're bending over like it hurts less? Or it's just easier to pick up your dog?

Kelsey Harris:

Exactly. Or like I do it like yin yoga, because it's all just like that really slow stretching type thing. Yeah.

Unknown:

Yeah. Love it. Yeah. Yeah, it's so good. Makes you feel so free. You released your body for once,

Kelsey Harris:

just recapping what's helped Sarah. So first exercise, just getting that body going. Second talking to someone or having a support system, which ultimately could be a friend or family member, a support group or therapist, and three, stretching, just having some mindful movement throughout the day. But so I am going to ask you some lightning round questions. So what would be the top five songs that describe your life? Oh,

Sarah Luby:

this is like the hardest question. Let me think I would say Don't stop me now. by Queen. It's like never give up even with your challenges. I'm obsessed with the musical Jagged Little Pill. Like I've been listening to it for the last six months on repeat. So I would say the song Perfect or that I would be good. They're just the lyrics are absolutely incredible in them and trying to think I mean, I'm still standing by elton john is kind of along the same theme of the Queen one but I'm a 17th gallop you're not getting that yet. You are not alone from dear Evan Hanson. I'm also a musical theatre person wasn't clear. And then I think honesty by Billy Joel because I think it just it spreads message of kindness. And, you know, I wish there was more honesty in this world because I think it makes it a better place and it makes it a more understanding place. So those would be the songs. I guess. I'm definitely missing some. But

Kelsey Harris:

I know asking for five songs is like really hard. So I appreciate that. You came up with five. I also love 70s music. So that's that's funny. It's interesting. It's the best era in my opinion. Yeah. So my neighbors were playing Fleetwood Mac last night and I could hear it and I was like, This is great. Like, I don't even have to turn on my music.

Sarah Luby:

Right. Well, the lyrics were also the best then they made story. They weren't just like, I don't want to say anything inappropriate, but so many lyrics. They just, yeah, I'll leave it at that, but it's not art.

Kelsey Harris:

Okay, next question. What's one thing you can't go a day without doing?

Sarah Luby:

Singing in some capacity? I mean, that's the most obvious thing to say. I mean, also hanging out with my dog.

Kelsey Harris:

What's one thing you plan on doing in your life, even with your illness?

Sarah Luby:

Oh, that's interesting, because I don't think I've really ever felt like my illness would stop me in any aspect. I'm pretty damn stubborn. But you know, pursuing my career in the performing arts, I plan to be on Broadway one day, and that's not gonna. It's not gonna hold me back. So

Kelsey Harris:

that's amazing. Yeah, it sounds like you're on your way there.

Sarah Luby:

I mean, I don't know about that. But I hope so.

Kelsey Harris:

Describe your perfect day.

Sarah Luby:

Oh, that's hard. I think the rapid fire questions are the hardest. I think it's something to do with being outdoors. My mom's gonna laugh at me because growing up, I detested doing anything outside, she would call me a spaz Amol girl. But now I've really, really grown into it. I don't know if spending the day with someone who's special to you, and kind of knows you on that deep, extremely personal level. And, you know, not even having to talk, just allowing yourself to be I think that's, that's really beautiful. So I guess that would kind of be a perfect day. That wasn't very specific. But

Kelsey Harris:

I like it just like be present. And you know, spend time with someone you like and nature. That sounds so lovely.

Sarah Luby:

Yeah.

Kelsey Harris:

And how are you making the most of your life right now?

Sarah Luby:

Setting goals, I would say, especially during the pandemic, I think it's affected so many people's mental health. I mean, it's obviously affected mine. Right, but not letting that stop you. I don't think it's I don't think it's correct, to say, being able to see the finish line. But like, I have a list of mental goals that I want to reach in my head. And I'm kind of understanding how it can get there right now. And also, you know, not waiting for other people to help you do that. I think that's, that's huge. Like, of course, it's wonderful to rely on others. But when it comes to your own life or your own career, you really have to be the person to make that change. And I think that's what I'm doing right now.

Kelsey Harris:

Amazing. I don't think I've really ever felt like my illness would stop me in any way. Okay, so now that is powerful. I think it's easy for people to feel like their illness can stop them. As a therapist and training. I specialize in working with people with chronic illness and chronic pain and their mental health. So if you're thinking to yourself right now, but my illness is stopping me. I know that's a real fight. I know that's a real fear. I like what Sarah said here because it's an attitude and mindset that can lead us to improving our physical and mental health and live a fulfilling life. Sarah, thank you so much for coming on the show one last question. Where can we find you and follow you and listen to your song and all that?

Sarah Luby:

Yes. You know what, I always forget what my Instagram handle is, and I meant figure it out before. Okay. I found it. It's Sarah_Luby14 that Sarah with an H The only correct way to spell it in my opinion. And then www.sarahvluby.com. Yeah. I don't know. I don't normally think about what my handles are. But yes, those are the correct ones.

Kelsey Harris:

Yeah. Awesome. Well, again, thank you for coming on. This has been so lovely.

Sarah Luby:

Yes. Thank you so much for having me. I love that we can talk about our illnesses and disabilities in such a positive light and hopefully, inspire others and let them know they're not alone. So thank you.

Kelsey Harris:

I personally got a lot out of this conversation with Sarah and I hope you do too. Before you go about your day, I really encourage you just to reflect on what you noticed about yourself while you listen to this episode. What did you notice about your thoughts and feelings specifically? And what are you noticing about them now as you're reflecting back on what you heard? If you could take Sarah and I on Instagram, our handles are down in the show notes. We would love to hear what your takeaways from this episode where my guests really appreciate hearing that feedback from you all. Don't forget to subscribe rate and review the show wherever you get your podcasts. You can support Sarah by taking a listen and downloading her song invisible and you can sure support the show by following the Patreon link in the show notes. And most importantly, everyone keep making the most special thanks to Nicole sicura for the original music and to charity Williams for tomorrow.